World Nature Conservation Day

July 27, 2020

The earth is our home. Regardless of where you live, we all share the same planet. On July 28th, we celebrate 2020 World Nature Conservation Day to focus our efforts on preserving our natural environment and keeping our home, Earth, healthy. The future of life on earth depends on a healthy climate – everything from food production to our favorite vacation spots are affected by the environment.

What can we do today to protect the future?

  • Support local businesses and help your community thrive by finding a local environmental cause to support, which can make a big impact for yourself and neighbors. What Does the U.S. EPA Do to Protect the Environment? is an activity book for young children outlining the different ways The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) protects human health and the environment.
  • Check your own habits to see how earth-friendly you are on a day-to-day basis. Are you following the three “R’s?”: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. EPA’s Consumer’s Handbook for Reducing Solid Waste describes how people can help solve a growing problem, garbage.
  • Share a love of nature with your kids, which can make a huge impact on the rest of their lives. Show your passion for protecting our environment with others and create a big change! The National Park Service (NPS) preserves natural and cultural resources in over 400 units for this generation and future generations. Teaching children to become Junior Rangers supports the mission by exploring, learning about, and helping to protect these areas for future generations. The Junior Ranger Activity Book for Utah’s Capitol Reef National Park is a great activity resource to learn about the park and earn a badge.

Nature conservation means protecting our environment and the wildlife it supports. It includes looking after biodiversity and the health of the planet. Logging, loss of milkweed breeding, climate change, and extreme weather are factors that help explain the decline of the best-known butterflies in North America, the monarch (Danaus plexippus). Read the Conservation Status and Ecology of the Monarch Butterfly in the United States report, which briefly summarizes the monarch’s North American distribution, life history, population, current conservation status, and potential causes of decline.

Isn’t it fun to just let time go by while we admire the beauty of nature and the bountiful gifts we receive? Most of us take our natural surroundings and resources for granted. Widespread damage to the environment in the form of reduced green cover, drought, global warming, and unexpected floods can be avoided. On World Nature Conservation Day, let’s rethink our outlook toward the environment and come up with activities and ideas to help nature.

Each year, the NPS conducts an assessment of the agency’s progress in meeting goals and objectives to lessen the NPS’s impact on the environment and improve human welfare. Read how the NPS is on track to achieve its goals in Green Parks Plan (GPP). The plan is framed around the following 10 sustainability categories and sets ambitious agency-wide goals.

  • Continuously Improve Environmental Performance
  • Be Climate Friendly and Climate Ready
  • Be Energy Smart
  • Be Water Wise
  • Green Our Rides
  • Buy Green and Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle
  • Preserve Outdoor Experiences, Promote Healthy Engagement
  • Strengthen Sustainability Partnerships
  • Foster Sustainability Beyond Our Boundaries
  • Green Our Grounds

Help raise awareness about the conservation of nature and stress the importance of preserving our natural resources. To ensure the well-being of our future generations, it is important that we work towards sustainable development and take care of our environment.

Today, the world urgently needs a new commitment to nature, especially as we recover from COVID-19. Below are additional suggested U.S. Government publications in support of World Nature Conservation Day.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

For the free resources, click on the links above.

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor BethAnn Telford is part of GPO’s Public Relations office.


Celebrate Arbor Day

April 27, 2017

Arbor Day celebrates the value of trees in our daily lives.  It is a special time set aside for tree planting.

For this Arbor Day, April 28, here are a few tips on how to honor those stately trees in your local parks and suburban landscapes by coming together and enjoy those quiet giant oaks, and even a still growing scruffy pine.

  • Hold an Arbor Day ceremony to honor the good stewards in your community.
  • Organize a Largest or Oldest Tree search across your community.
  • Plant a tree. Host a reception to honor Park or Tree Board members in the community.
  • Create a story, produce a play, or present a skit about trees.
  • Choose a public park or downtown area to clean up.
  • Sponsor a craft show featuring artists engaged in crafts with natural materials.
  • Schedule classes on tree pruning, tree selection, identification and planting.
  • Hold a Children’s Read-In at the library.

Best of all…. read a book at home about trees – with your children.

The U.S. Government Bookstore offers publications covering some of the above subjects plus a wide range of “tree hugging” topics depending on your interests. Here a just few examples.

Why Would Anyone Cut a Tree Down?

This delightful book shows children the life cycle of trees, showing that trees are a renewable resource as their seeds can be planted to make new trees grow. It also discusses the need to remove sick, flammable, and other dangerous trees as well as the various uses for wood from cut trees.

National Individual Tree Species Atlas

This reference covers each tree species in the United States and precisely where each species is likely to grow or not grow. Written primarily for horticulturists, the contents are also a wonderful resource for anyone studying America’s tree population: from Boy and Girl Scouts, to landscapers, to forestry professors and guides.

How To Prune Trees

This handy pamphlet provides helpful information on how, when, and why to prune. By following the few simple principles outlined in this publication, you will learn how to produce strong, healthy, attractive plants.

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Ed Kessler is a Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication and Information Sales program office.


From Prairies to Peaks with Rockies and Roosevelts

April 3, 2013

Guest blogger GPO Public Relations Specialist Emma Wojtowicz reviews this new publication by the U.S. Forest Service that explores the history of the Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain region, including the involvement of two Roosevelts.

From-Prairies-to-Peaks-US-Forest-ServiceThose traveling west-bound for spring break and summer vacation should check out From Prairies to Peaks: A History of the Rocky Mountain Region of the U.S. Forest Service, 1905-2012. This publication focuses on the Rocky Mountain region, which encompasses Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming and is home to 17 national forests and seven national grasslands.  In From Prairies to Peaks, author Anthony Godfrey takes readers on a tour of the Rocky Mountains to learn about the topography, climate and wildlife as well as the history stretching from when Native Americans originally inhabited the region to the preservation efforts made in recent decades by the Forest Service.

Readers must be true aficionados of the West and Rocky Mountains to digest this nearly 400-page publication. The history is very detailed, but very fascinating.  During the development of the West in the 19th century, it was believed that the United States had an abundance of forest resources, and millions of acres of trees were cleared as a result.

After the Civil War, the threat of a timber famine alerted the government to the problem and brought greater attention to forest management. Passed under President Theodore Roosevelt, the Federal Forest Transfer Act of 1905 moved control of the 63 million acres of national forest reserves from the Department of the Interior to the Department of Agriculture’s Bureau of Forestry, which was renamed the Forest Service.

President-Theodore-Roosevelt-1908-Cartoon-as-Practical-Forester

Image: 1908 editorial cartoon of President Theodore Roosevelt as “A Practical Forester.”  Source: St. Paul Minnesota “Pioneer Press”.

One of the most interesting time periods for the region was the 1920s-1930s. Upkeep and development of the Rocky Mountain region created many jobs for men through New Deal programs during the Great Depression.  In national forests, workers were assigned to tree planting and thinning, insect and rodent control, road building and improvement, telephone line construction, and lookout tower and house construction to increase communication for fire control and timber conservation.

Then during the Dust Bowl, the region played an important role in President Franklin Roosevelt’s Great Plains Shelterbelt Project from 1934-1942, which involved planting a shelterbelt or windbreak of drought-resistant trees and shrubs and from Canada to northern Texas to protect against the winds and prevent erosion.

10-row-shelterbelt-cross-sectionImage: Cross-section of a shelterbelt of various sized evergreens, large and small deciduous trees, and shrubs using the Forest Service-recommended standard of 10 rows that serve as a windbreak and wildlife shelter. Image source: MyFarmlife.com.

The Forest Service assigned the Rocky Mountain region with supervising the planting of more than 217 million trees and shrubs on the windward side of more than 30,000 individual farms. This is just a snapshot of the in-depth history chronicled in this publication.

Planting-first-shelterbelt-tree-OKFrom Prairies to Peaks provides a historical account of one of the lesser known regions in the United States. The West conjures images of cowboys, mountains, hikers and skiers, but there is more to the Rocky Mountain region.

This publication is a great resource for those interested in learning more about the West and the Forest Service. And for those already familiar with the Rocky Mountains region, this book will help you brush up on your history.

Image: Planting the first tree in the Nation’s first shelterbelt on the H.E. Curtis farm near Mangum in Greer county, Oklahoma, on March 18, 1935. Image source: Oklahoma Farm Report.

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS  PUBLICATION: From Prairies to Peaks: A History of the Rocky Mountain Region of the U.S. Forest Service, 1905-2012?

  • Buy it online 24/7 at GPO’s Online Bookstore.
  • Buy it at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday-Friday, 9am to 4pm, except Federal holidays, (202) 512-0132.
  • Find it in a library.

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