Educate Yourself about Radiation Protection Regulations with Historical Research from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission

October 18, 2018

This week is Nuclear Science Week, which supports national and international interests relating to all aspects of nuclear science.

Radioactive waste storage courtesy of http://www.nrc.gov

In support of Nuclear Science Week, I thought it would be valuable to reflect on the history of nuclear power in the United States, including regulations into radiation protection for Americans. These types of regulations may assist in developing clean energy, avoiding future radioactive accidents, and helping insure proper radioactive waste material disposal.

The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently released these print historical volumes that cover major milestones within the United States nuclear power resources and regulatory environment.

 Three Mile Island: A Nuclear Crisis in Historical Perspective

Inside this book, you will find a bit of history about nuclear power that began in 1954 when the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (112th Congress, 2nd Session) became a law.  This scholarly text explores the political, business, construction, and environmental elements surrounding nuclear power plant safety and regulation within the United States.  It also covers many insights into the reactor faults that led to Three Mile Island’s accident, evacuation of employees and political aftermath.  Nuclear reactor engineers, operators, technicians, students as well as professionals and policy analysts pursuing research about Three Mile Island, clean energy, nuclear engineering and ionizing radiation may be interested in this work.

Permissable Dose: A History of Radiation Protection in the Twentieth Century

While reading this academic text, you will learn about the role of U.S. federal agencies in radiation safety, and about the evolution of radiation protection regulations.  It traces how the principles and practices of radiation protection have changed over time in response to political and scientific developments.  This book underscores  historical efforts to provide adequate protection against the hazards of radiation to workers exposed in their jobs and to the general public.   Environmental science, pre-med, medical students and professionals may be interested in the 20th century history of radiation protection to compare it with modern-day regulations.

Image courtesy of http://www.nrc.gov.

The Road to Yucca Mountain: The Development of Radioactive Waste Policy in the United States

The last resource within this trilogy by the same author, J.S. Walker, historian at the United States Regulatory Commission, traces the efforts of policy makers to find solutions to complex issues relating to waste management from commercial applications of nuclear energy that have become a source of scientific and public inquiry.  Within this book, Walker examines the early history of radioactive waste disposal at government installations that produced materials for nuclear weapons.

Find more resources relating to this topic in our Nuclear Power & Radiation collection.

More about Hazardous (HAZMAT & CBRNE) Materials

Discover more products from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC).

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author:  This week’s blog contributor is Maureen Whelan, Senior Marketing Team Leader for GPO’s Publications and Information Sales program office in Washington, DC. Maureen oversees print and digital content dissemination strategy and manages third party free and paid content distribution through platforms and vendors, such as Apple iBookstore, Barnesandnoble.com, Google Play eBookstore, Ebscohost databases, Overdrive, ProQuest, and more.


On the Anniversary of the British Surrender at Yorktown, Read This Book

October 16, 2018

October 17 is an important date in American history. Not sure why? The Government Publishing Office, as always, is here with a publication to enlighten you.

On October 17, 1781 (that’s 237 years ago), Lord Cornwallis of Britain surrendered his army at Yorktown. March to Victory: Washington, Rochambeau, and the Yorktown Campaign of 1781, a publication by Dr. Robert Selig, walks readers through the American troops’ march to victory in the Revolutionary War and the large role the French played in helping America gain its independence.

Throughout this booklet learn the endearing details of the relationship between General George Washington and French commander General Rochambeau. Despite having reservations, Rochambeau pledged to use all the resources at his disposal to support Washington’s plan. France promised both to fight and also to agree to no separate peace until Britain formally recognized American independence. To work together to defeat the British under the command of Lord Cornwallis, these French and American military commanders had to overcome formidable barriers of culture, language, tactical doctrine, and political agendas. They used translators to work out plans, including the plan to commence an operation against the British, with Washington focused on an attack in New York and Rochambeau preferring an operation against British forces in the South. In the end, Rochambeau promised his full cooperation in an attack on New York City at the wish of Washington.

Despite having been enemies just 15 years earlier in the French and Indian War, the respect among the French and American troops grew steadily the more they worked together. Jonathan Trumbull, Washington’s private secretary, wrote, “The Junction of the two armies [which] is formed at this Place, & has commenced with high seeming Cordiality & Affection, demonstrated by constant Acts of Conviviality & social Harmony.” Baron Closen of the French army wrote, “I admire the American troops tremendously! It is incredible that soldiers composed of men of every age, even of children of fifteen, of whites and blacks, almost naked, unpaid and rather poorly fed, can march so well and withstand fire so steadfastly.”

General George Washington soon realized, however, that without additional massive reinforcements and material, as well as the assistance of a powerful fleet, an assault on New York had little chance of success. He became convinced it was best to head south. He wrote in his diary that he “could scarce see a ground upon which to continue my preparations against New York, and therefore I turned my views more seriously (than I had done before) to an operation to the southward.”

In early August 1781, French military officer Marquis de Lafayette drafted a report to Washington letting him know that Cornwallis and his men were settling in on the banks of the York River. But to trap the British army, a naval force would be necessary. Again, the Americans turned to the French in their time of need. Rochambeau informed Francois Joseph Paul de Grasse, the commander of the French fleet, of the demand for ships, and de Grasse agreed to send a fleet to Chesapeake. De Grasse’s fleet of 36 ships outnumbered that of the British, who had only 18. However, de Grasse promised to keep his fleet there only until October 15. So, the two commanders in chief hastily adjusted their plans to march south knowing that time was of the essence.

To throw off the British, Washington had a few tricks up his sleeve. He ordered ships for Staten Island and had bake ovens built in New Jersey. Made-up stories about movements and plans were intentionally leaked to the troops, in the hopes that they would be overheard by spies and passed onto the British headquarters. And by dispersing the French and American armies on multiple different routes south, the allies continued their antics to try to confuse their enemy. It wasn’t until early September that the British realized Cornwallis and his troops were in danger. By then, the first units of the Continental Army had already reached the northernmost part of the Chesapeake Bay.

During the march south, several American soldiers quit due to the fact that Robert Morris, financier of the American Revolution, did not have the funds to pay them. Once again, the French stepped in. On September 7, Morris asked Rochambeau if he could lend the Americans money to compensate the troops. Rochambeau gave him almost half the amount left in his treasury. This was the first and only time many Continental soldiers received hard money during their years of service to their country, and to say they were thrilled would be an understatement.

In early September George Washington invited Rochambeau and his staff to stay at his Mount Vernon home. The two commanders continued their journey together and arrived at Williamsburg on September 15 to wait for the arrival of their troops. With a little teamwork, they met with de Grasse and convinced him to keep the French fleet in America until the end of October, buying them more time. After being supplied ships to help them finish out their journey to Virginia, members of the Continental Army were the first to arrive in Virginia. They docked at Archer’s Hope, marched into Williamsburg and camped behind the College of William and Mary. Yes – the college, which was founded in 1693, was already there at that time! The French met them about one week later. Once the French and American troops were all back together again (now in the South), the armies of Washington and Rochambeau finally set out for Yorktown.

Beginning on October 3, 1781, a series of attacks and counterattacks ensued among the British and the French and American forces. On October 16, the British managed to seize two French artillery positions, but the effort ultimately proved unsuccessful. So, they tried it another way and attempted to break the encirclement the French and Americans had created. But as troops were being ferried across the York River to conduct the attack, Mother Nature intervened. A storm disrupted the British operation. Cornwallis began to realize that the Americans and French held a decisive advantage. On October 17, a British officer waved a white handkerchief in surrender. The next day, two British officers met with an American and a French counterpart to negotiate surrender terms. The British government recognized the independence of the United States in the Treaty of Paris, which officially ended the Revolutionary War in 1783.

That’s just the tip of the iceberg. Read the full story of the March to Victory. Order this publication from the Center of Military History at the GPO Bookstore today.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


Down to Earth Publications for Earth Science Week

October 12, 2018

How does our Earth inspire you? That’s the question being asked this Earth Science Week 2018, which has a theme of “Earth as Inspiration.” According to earthsciweek.org, Earth Science Week was started in 1998 “to help the public gain a better understanding and appreciation for the Earth sciences and to encourage the stewardship of the Earth.” And what better way to gain an understanding of Earth than through reading and hands-on educational activities?

Know a youngster who has a knack for science? NSI: Nature Science Investigator from the U.S. Forest Service is a self-guided activity book for children ages 8–14 that enables students to become the scientist. They’ll have the opportunity to try their hands in all sorts of roles, from an ecologist to a soil scientist to an atmospheric scientist to a biological scientist and more! With this booklet, students are introduced to outdoor, hands-on activities like looking for litter, finding the tallest tree, rubbing a sample of soil and inspecting insects. No matter where they like to explore – in the schoolyard, at home, in the park, or at the playground – young nature science investigators can spend their day as a real scientist with this booklet.

It’s no secret that it’s pretty darn hot on the sun, but how much do we really know about the climate of space or the sun? For those interested in the events and processes that connect the Sun to the Earth, The Sun, the Earth, and Near-Earth Space: A Guide to the Sun-Earth System from NASA is an obvious choice. This colorful book provides concise explanations and descriptions of what is now known about the Sun-Earth System and offers a particular emphasis on space weather and sun-climate.

Also from NASA comes Our Changing Atmosphere: Discoveries From EOS Aura. This booklet details discoveries from the Earth Observing System satellite Aura, which was launched in 2004. According to NASA, “Aura’s measurements will enable us to investigate questions about ozone trends, air quality changes and their linkage to climate change.” Aura is part of the Earth Science Projects Division of NASA, a program dedicated to monitoring the complex interactions that affect the globe using NASA satellites and data systems.

The GLOBE Earth System Poster Learning Activities book is designed to help scientists, teachers, students, and others understand variations in environmental parameters by examining connections among different phenomena measured on local, regional and global scales. It demonstrates the relationships between and among environmental data. Readers will learn about how the environment is the result of the interplay among many processes that take place on varying time and spatial scales. This book also explains that environmental processes are not bound by oceans, mountains, or country delineations, but are truly global in scope. Also available from the GPO Bookstore to go along with this publication is Satellite Images to Accompany the GLOBE Earth System Poster Learning Activities Guide.

We hope we’ve inspired you to immerse yourself in all that these Earth publications have to offer! There really is no place like Earth (well, that we know of at least!), so it’s vital that we take the time to learn about our planet and be thankful for all it has to offer. What are you waiting for? Head over to the GPO Bookstore and get down to Earth!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


National Hispanic Heritage Month

October 11, 2018

National Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated annually September 15 – October 15. During this important event, the U.S. Government Bookstore invites you to enjoy the many publications available online for and about Hispanic Americans.

There is a great variety of publications to select ranging from materials for the naturalization test to parenting guides such as child safety tips, fun booklets for kids to learn about America’s great national parks and outdoor life, improving on your family’s health, to a manual for managing a responsible business enterprise in emerging market economies and more.

Here are just a few titles in English and Spanish to consider:

Amazing Me: It’s Busy Being 3

In this story, an amazing kangaroo named Joey shows all of the amazing things he can do now that he is 3 years old. These amazing things are called developmental milestones. First steps, first words, and using the potty for the first time are all developmental milestones. Other developmental milestones, like the ones in this book, may not be as easy to see, but they are just as important for your child’s development. This book will show you what to look for as your child grows and develops. Click here for Spanish version.

Preparing for the Naturalization Test: A Pocket Study Guide

This pocket study guide will help you prepare for the naturalization test. If you were not born in the United States, naturalization is the way that you can voluntarily become a U.S. citizen. To become a naturalized U.S. citizen, you must pass the naturalization test. This Pocket Study Guide provides you with the civics test questions and answers, and the reading and writing vocabulary to help you study. Click here for Spanish version.

A Do-It-Yourself Guide to Sealing and Insulating With Energy Star: Sealing Air Leaks and Adding Attic Insulation

Sealing and Insulating your home is one of the most cost-effective ways to make a home more comfortable and energy efficient—and you can do it yourself.

Use This Guide To:

  •  Learn how to find and seal hidden attic and basement air leaks
  •  Determine if your attic insulation is adequate, and learn how to add more
  •  Make sure your improvements are done safely
  •  Reduce energy bills and help protect the environment

Glossary of terms is included in this illustrated do-it-yourself guide. Click here for Spanish version.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Ed Kessler is a Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication and Information Sales program office.


Having Fun With Fire Safety

October 9, 2018

Fire Prevention Week 2018 has begun. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has declared this year’s theme “Look. Listen. Learn. Be aware – fire can happen anywhere.”

Its website states:

“Through three simple calls-to-action, this year’s theme identifies basic but essential ways people can reduce their risk to fire and be prepared in the event of one:

Look for places fire can start

Listen for the sound of the smoke alarm

Learn two ways out of each room”

According to the NFPA, the majority of fire deaths (four out of five) occur at home each year. The association emphasizes advanced planning as being critical.

And according to Fire Rescue 1, most house fires start in the kitchen from unattended cooking or grease that has become overheated. Candles are also often a culprit of home fires and home fire deaths. Finally, the site also mentions that approximately two-thirds of all fire deaths happen in homes where there’s no working fire alarm. Your chance of dying in a home fire is cut in half if you have a working smoke alarm.

Knowing these facts about fire safety is incredibly important, as is being prepared.

For as far back as I can remember, my family would regularly practice fire drills in our home. My dad would give us specific instructions on what to do and where to go. We practiced getting to safety as quickly as possible, as though a real fire were enveloping our home. I recall being scared thinking about our house potentially catching fire as a child and running through what things from my room I would grab if it happened. But I learned what to do in the event a real fire occurred. And while my parents emphasized the seriousness of the issue, our entire family also had fun doing these drills. I recall laughter and will forever have that memory of something we all did together as a family.

There’s so much to learn about fire safety, and education and preparedness are essential. The Government Publishing Office has resources to help you and your entire family, from children to grandparents, prepare for a fire.

Let’s Have Fun With Fire Safety is a fun activity book that gives children valuable fire safety and prevention tips. My family fire drills are just one example that fire safety doesn’t have to be a drag. Make it fun with resources like this one, and children will be more likely to pay attention and participate.

Kids aren’t the only ones who need to prepare for a fire. Adults age 65 and older are more than twice as likely to die in fires than the Nation’s population as a whole. Individuals 85 and older are more than four times as likely to die in a fire than the general population. Also, older adults have a higher risk of injury from fires. If you are a caregiver to a senior, check out Fire Safety Checklist for Older Adults, designed to help seniors and their caregivers learn about fire safety.

Fire prevention is a serious topic. But practicing drills and getting educated can be a fun opportunity for family bonding. Check out these publications from the U.S. Government Publishing Office, and remember to look, listen and learn this Fire Prevention Week!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


No More Monkeying Around: Getting Real About Animal Welfare

October 2, 2018

If you have a pet or are just a self-proclaimed animal lover who purposefully takes the route past the dog park (you know who you are), you know how important it is that we make the world a better place for all animals. That’s where World Animal Day comes in. Celebrated annually on October 4, this recognition day is meant “to raise the status of animals in order to improve welfare standards around the globe.” No more monkeying around! It’s time to get real about animal welfare.

The Animal Welfare Act (AWA) was passed by Congress in 1966. It sets general standards for humane care and treatment that must be provided for certain animals that are bred for commercial sale, sold sight unseen (on the Internet), exhibited to the public, used in biomedical research, or transported commercially.

The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has published the Animal Welfare Act and Animal Welfare Regulations, also known as the “Blue Book,” as a tool to improve compliance among those responsible for the care and handling of animals, including farmers, and to enhance the consistency of inspections by field inspectors. The Blue Book consolidates the AWA and applicable regulations and standards into one source.

The book walks readers through specifications for the human handling, care, treatment and transportation of any animal you may be working with – dogs, cats, guinea pigs and hamsters, marine mammals, rabbits and more. Exact details for heating, cooling, sanitation, ventilation, lighting and space required for animals are all included. Just like us, animals need exercise! The law calls for dealers, exhibitors, and research facilities to develop, document, and follow an appropriate plan for animals to exercise. The AWA also requires adequate veterinary care. You may particularly be interested in the laws for research facilities, including personnel qualifications, and mandated recordkeeping and annual reports. These are all laid out in the book.

Animals offer so much joy to our lives as humans. Just the violent wag of a dog’s tail can put a smile on my face. Seeing a dolphin’s fin bob above the waves makes my heart leap with excitement. And hearing birds chirp in the morning is music to my ears. It’s vital that we keep the animals we love so much healthy, happy and safe. So check out this publication today at the GPO Bookstore. And whether you’re running the trails or cuddling on the couch, do it with your favorite furry friend this World Animal Day!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


What are tariffs and why are they important to U.S. citizens?

September 28, 2018

Tariffs are key components of trade, especially international trade.  Most American consumers’ merchandise, especially fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) may be purchased from other countries to use in our households and workplaces.    These consumer goods for American citizens must follow the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States for imports from other countries to America.  These tariff schedules are monitored by the U.S. International Trade Commission.

Imports and exports often impact the economic balance to a country’s revenues, operating expenses, and fiscal policies.

Image courtesy of https://usitc.gov/.

The Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (HTSUS) is the primary resource for determining applicable tariff rates and statistical categories for all merchandise imported into the United States. It can also be used in place of Schedule B for classifying goods exported from the United States to foreign countries.

The U.S. Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) classifies a good based on its name, use, and/or the material used in its construction and assigns it a ten-digit number. There are over 17,000 unique ten-digit HTS classification code numbers.

The Harmonized Tariff Schedule is based on the International Harmonized Commodity Coding and Classification System established by the World Customs Organization (WCO). Virtually all countries base their tariff schedules on the WCO’s Harmonized System.

The Harmonized Tariff Schedules of the United States are available as a print subscription product or CD-ROM format.

Custom Brokers will need to be familiar with the nomenclature found within these tariff schedules for the custom brokers’ licensure exam.  Economists, political scientists, small, medium-sized, and large businesses’ senior management executives will want to be familiar with these schedules to identify growth markets and work with their trade compliance teams to ensure that their organization is properly classifying their merchandise.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author:  This week’s blog contributor is Maureen Whelan, Senior Marketing Team Leader for GPO’s Publications and Information Sales program office in Washington, DC. Maureen oversees print and digital content dissemination strategy and manages third party free and paid content distribution through platforms and vendors, such as Apple iBookstore, Barnesandnoble.com, Google Play eBookstore, Ebscohost databases, Overdrive, ProQuest, and more.


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