Government Resources for July Fourth

July 2, 2020

This year, July Fourth will undoubtedly look a little different than usual. While many fireworks displays and other celebrations have been cancelled this year due to the coronavirus pandemic, there are still many ways to let freedom ring. That includes making a visit to GPO Online Bookstore for some patriotic publications.

On July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress formally adopted the Declaration of Independence, inspiring Independence Day, a day for Americans to come together, celebrate their freedom and display patriotism. As is written by the National Archives, the Declaration of Independence “states the principles on which our government, and our identity as Americans, are based.” This document, which continues to be an inspiration for freedom and equality around the world, declared why the thirteen colonies considered themselves independent from Great Britain. Representatives from all thirteen colonies (New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia) signed the document. If you want to feel truly patriotic this year, you can purchase a pocket edition of the Declaration of Independence from the GPO Bookstore.

Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence (Pocket Edition) contains two core American democracy documents—the Constitution of the United States of America and the Declaration of Independence. This official primary source document outlines the framework of our National Government. Keep this handy pocket-sized document on you to exhibit your pride for your country … and to add a little patriotism to your already red, white and blue Fourth of July ensemble. This booklet also defines the ratification and amendment ratification process.

The Citizen’s Almanac from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services says “naturalized citizens have played an important role in shaping this country. From Alexander Hamilton to Albert Einstein, foreign-born Americans have contributed to all aspects of society—literature, motion pictures, public service, and athletics, to name just a few.” This almanac, available at the GPO Bookstore, offers information on the history, people, and events that have made the United States a beacon of hope and freedom to the world. This booklet will serve as a reminder of the important rights and responsibilities immigrants will have as a U.S. citizen and is perfect for anyone preparing themselves for taking the Naturalization Test to become a citizen of the United States.

GPO wishes you and your family a safe and healthy July 4th. Happy Independence Day!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


Books We Love

February 6, 2020

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. While a heart-shaped box of chocolates gets opened and eaten and roses soon wilt, books will always be there for us to love! Here are some of the Federal publications that have stolen our hearts.

Amazing Me: It’s Busy Being 3 In this story, a kangaroo named Joey shows all of the amazing things he can do now that he is three years old. Joey is working on dressing himself and taking turns and loves playing make-believe. With this book, your child will find koala bears throughout the story as Joey continues to learn and grow. See if your three-year-old is able to do some of the same things as Joey. 

2020 Explore Science (NASA Calendar) The 2020 NASA Calendar is all about space exploration. Each month of the calendar boasts a two-page spread that features a large image in space and a science expert who has contributed to NASA’s discoveries and innovations. The calendar also includes Operating and Future Missions of NASA’s Explore Science program. The calendar also includes January and February 2021 to keep you planning into early the following year!

The Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence (Pocket Edition) Who wouldn’t want to carry the powerful words of our Founding Fathers in their pocket? This pocket-sized booklet contains the complete text of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution of the United States so you can have it handy at any time. We had to include this critical document on our list of ones to love!

Yellowstone National Park Trip Planner 2020 Handsome bison, brightly colored geysers, and scenic canyons galore! What’s not to love about Yellowstone National Park? This trip planner is just what you need to hit the best of this 30,000-square-mile park. This guide provides activities for visitors of all ages, a park map, and more. Plan a trip you won’t soon forget to the very first national park in the world.

Then Came The Fire: Personal Accounts From the Pentagon, 11 September 2001 Though it’s pretty impossible to understand what the people at the Pentagon experienced on September 11, 2001, the U.S. Army Center of Military History is helping to recount the day through the eyes of those who witnessed it. Two days after the September 11 attack, the U.S. Army Center of Military History began an extensive project to document the event through oral interviews. The compelling accounts presented in this anthology include excerpts from the interviews and written recollections from people who experienced the event first-hand.

Earth at Night: Our Planet in Brilliant Darkness This publication from NASA provides majestic images of space orbits at nighttime. Flip through spectacular photos of natural phenomena such as auroras, wildfires, phytoplankton, and volcanic eruptions. Scientists can use this “nightlight” data to show the changing planet and can use these applications to forecast a city’s energy use, carbon emissions, and more. Satellite images also compare Hurricanes Maria in Puerto Rico, Matthew and Michael in the Southeastern United States, and Hurricane Sandy in the Eastern United States to the effects of War in Syria and Iraq in the Middle East.

We sure hope you love these publications as much as we do. Happy Valentine’s Day from GPO!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Holiday Gift Guide: Publications for the American History Buff

December 18, 2019

Holly jolly, so good to see you, our little elves! Welcome to our final installation of the 2019 GPO Gift Guide. Do you know someone who loves American history? We have the perfect gifts for them, so take a break from stuffing those stockings, and read on!

To be a true American History buff, you’ve got to know the story of Lewis and Clark! United States Army and the Lewis and Clark Expedition, prepared as part of the Army’s contribution to the observance of the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Commemoration, is an engaging account of a stirring and significant event in American military heritage. While most Americans have some inkling of the importance of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, officially designated the “Corps of Volunteers for North Western Discovery,” relatively few recognize that it was an Army endeavor from beginning to end.

Blending their fine writing skills, authors David W. Hogan Jr. and Charles E. White tell the unvarnished story of Captain Meriwether Lewis’s and Captain William Clark’s military mission ordered by President Thomas Jefferson. Lewis and Clark, with twenty-seven other soldiers plus four civilians, two of whom were under contract with the War Department, carried out the president’s intent and trekked from the mouth of the Missouri River to the Pacific Coast and back. Hogan’s and White’s memorable study is evocative of the courage and discipline of the Army today.

Another must have for American History lovers? This pocket-sized booklet containing the complete text of the Declaration of Independence and Constitution of the United States. Now, the words of our Founding Fathers will be available right at your American past aficionado’s fingertips. This little booklet is the perfect size to fit in all those stockings you’ve been trying to fill. Toothbrushes and candy are classic stocking stuffers no doubt; add this little surprise in, and you’ll be almost as professional a gift giver as Santa Claus himself … almost, that is.

For someone who needs to dress up their room a little bit, this Philadelphia, 1776 poster offers detailed information about Philadelphia, including its intellectual awakening of the Enlightenment, its budding architecture, and its economic prosperity, during the Revolutionary War. And the poster Continental Soldier in the War for American Independence gives detailed information about how the infantry fought, who the army commanders were, and the nearly impossible conditions American soldiers endured. Plus, once wrapped, these tubular shaped gifts are such a fun addition to the present pile full of perfect boxes. See who can guess what it is before it’s opened!

Then, give your special recipient the gift of knowledge with Defending a New Nation, 1783–1811. This initial volume of the “U.S. Army Campaigns of the War of 1812” series published by the Department of Defense, the Department of the Army, and the Center of Military History describes how the American Army gradually rose to the top during the War of 1812. The booklet tells the story of several military campaigns against Indians in the Northwest Territory, the Army’s role in suppressing the Whiskey Rebellion (1794), the Quasi-War with France and confrontations with Spain, the influence of Jeffersonian politics on the Army’s structure, and the Lewis and Clark Expedition.

Do you have additional gift ideas for someone who can’t get enough American history? Let us know in the comments below. Thanks so much for following our 2019 Holiday Gift Guide. Happy holidays from all of us here at GPO!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


The Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence

August 2, 2016

9780160514234295It’s an election year, there’s no better time for your family to read and discuss the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence.

These two documents represent the core principles of American democracy.

The U.S. Government Bookstore offers the pocket version of the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence for your convenience to carry wherever you go.

Pick-up your copy of the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence (Pocket Edition) now!

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

 Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Trudy Hawkins is a Marketing and Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication and Information Sales program office.

 

 


Bill of Rights Day

December 15, 2015

It has been said that the Declaration of Independence was the promise; the Constitution was the fulfillment. Then you might say that the Bill of Rights was the affirmation. Today, December 15, those enduring first ten amendments to the Constitution are 224 years old. GPO makes available a pocket copy of The Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence that includes the celebrated Bill of Rights.

052-071-01545-1Since they were ratified in 1791, that compact collection of amendments have become some of the most talked about text in history. Before the guarantees of the Bill of Rights were plainly enumerated in the Constitution, there was a rumbling fear of the tyrannical actions of government. In response, James Madison authored a list of amendments requiring approval from the House, Senate, and all states. His list enshrined as inalienable rights the self-evident truths invoked in preceding documents.

Although the phrase itself does not appear explicitly in the Constitution, The Bill of Rights is a foundation stone of a document that has lived long and large. Because of it, fundamental freedoms such as religion, speech, and due process of law are formally protected within the supreme law of the land.

The Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights are three extraordinary documents. They are the slow-burning coals of a quiet revolution, a steady progression to improve the quality of American life. Together they secure individual liberties and safeguard the spirit of popular sovereignty extolled in the phrase “we the people.” Now is as good a time as any for “we the people” to re-read them.

How do I get the pocket edition of the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Our guest blogger is Chelsea Milko, Public Relations Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations Office.


The Constitution Annotated: The Pursuit of App-iness

September 17, 2013

follow-the-founding-fathers-david-bowman_computerIn preparing for this Constitution Day blog post, not only did I retake the civics quiz from last year’s Constitution Day post (see Quiz: Are you smarter than an 8th grade Civics student?), I also scrolled through my tablet last night, reading the Preamble to the Constitution and looking up related quotes. Then it occurred to me: if Founding Father George Washington had been alive today, would he have been a PC or an Apple guy? I’m betting our pragmatic First President would be a PC guy. I’m pretty sure innovator Thomas Jefferson would have been a stylish iPad man, and Benjamin Franklin, inventor of the bifocals, would probably be sporting Google Glasses now and tinkering with them.

Image: Founding Fathers Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, George Washington. Original Illustration by David Bowman from his book “What Would the Founding Fathers Think?”

constitution-annotated-printWhat is clear is that our Founding Fathers were strategic thinkers who realized that a fully functioning republic needed a clear but flexible code of law that evolved with the Nation. Thus, they wrote the Constitution of the United States, which has stood the test of time with over two centuries of amendments and interpretations by all branches of the U.S. Federal Government.

CONAN for the Librarian (and Lawyers)

Since 1913, the Senate has directed that a publication be issued summarizing the current state of the Constitution to date, with all the amendments and the official interpretations, with the analysis today provided by the Library of Congress’ Congressional Research Service. This publication is called The Constitution of the United States of America, Analysis and Interpretation, popularly known as the Constitution Annotated or “CONAN” among the real insiders.

Constitution-of-the-US-Pocket-GuideIn addition, many Americans, including Members of Congress, buy a pocket print edition of the Constitution and Declaration of Independence to carry around with them at all times. (Click on image to the left.)

Constitution Goes Mobile and Online

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Constitution Annotated publication, and to celebrate it and Constitution Day, the Government Printing Office (GPO) not only issued the Centennial Edition in print, but has also worked with the Senate Committee on Rules and Administration and the Library of Congress to develop and launch both a new mobile app as well as a web publication that make analysis and interpretation of constitutional case law by Library experts accessible for free to anyone with a computer or mobile device.

The new resources, which include analysis of Supreme Court cases through June 26, 2013, will be updated multiple times each year as new court decisions are issued.  Legal professionals, teachers, students and anyone researching the constitutional implications of a particular topic can easily locate constitutional amendments, federal and state laws that were held unconstitutional, and tables of recent cases with corresponding topics and constitutional implications.

The new app and improved web publication will make the nearly 3,000-page “Constitution Annotated” more accessible to more people and enable updates of new case analysis three or four times each year.

Public Printer Davita Vance-Cooks said,

“Through this collaborative project, the Library of Congress and GPO are providing the public with timely access to an enhanced, authenticated version of the “Constitution Annotated” through GPO’s Federal Digital System. This is another example of how GPO works with Congress, the Library and other agencies to meet the information needs of the American people in the digital age.”

Keeping our “Complex Machinery” in Working Order

On May 19, 1821, years after the Constitution was adopted, John Adams wrote in a letter to Thomas Jefferson that:

“A free government is a complicated piece of machinery, the nice and exact adjustment of whose springs, wheels, and weights, is not yet well comprehended by the artists of the age, and still less by the people.”

Even though our Founding Fathers could not have envisioned a digital future complete with the Internet and smartphones, the framework they put in place has been able to roll with the times. Americans know that our system is indeed a “complicated piece of machinery,” with our laws serving as the user manual, but tools like the Constitution Annotated– in print or now online or on your mobile device– now exist to help keep our machinery of democracy well oiled.

George-Washingtons-Annotated-Copy-of-a-Draft-of-the-U.S.-ConstitutionImage: Even George Washington annotated his copy of the Constitution! (seen left). Source: National Archives

How can I obtain The Constitution Annotated?

1) Buy the Print Edition of The Constitution of the United States of America, Analysis and Interpretation, Centennial Edition

2) Mobile app version of the Constitution Annotated

  • For Apple iOS Devices: Download the new Constitution Annotated app for iOS devices for free from Apple’s iTunes Store or via this direct link: http://beta.congress.gov/constitution-annotated/.
  • ·        For Android Devices: An Android version of this app is under development.

3) Constitution Annotated web publication on FDsys.gov

The Constitution Annotated web publication will be available on GPO’s Federal Digital System (FDsys) www.fdsys.gov as a digitally-signed, searchable PDF that includes a linked table of contents, a linked table of cases, a linked index and GPO’s Seal of Authenticity on every page.

The new Constitution Annotated and a suite of constitutional resources can be viewed at http://beta.congress.gov/constitution-annotated/. The page features links to the app stores, an interactive table listing recent cases of high interest, a bibliography of Constitution-related primary documents in American history and tips for searching the Constitution Annotated on GPO’s website at www.gpo.gov/constitutionannotated.

About the Author: Government Book Talk Editor Michele Bartram is Promotions Manager for GPO’s Publication and Information Sales Division in Washington, DC, and is responsible for online and offline marketing of the US Government Online Bookstore (http://bookstore.gpo.gov) and promoting Federal government content to the public.


The Constitution: Pocket and Otherwise

May 28, 2010

Last week a Capitol Hill paper did a piece on the popularity of the United States Constitution as a publication and one of the news services picked it up. Although those of us who work at the Government Printing Office think of the “Pocket Constitution” authorized by Congress as the classic printed version, many other organizations also print and distribute copies, as the article points out. At least one other Federal Government agency does its own edition of the Pocket Constitution: U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), as part of its effort to encourage immigrants to become citizens. Like the congressional edition, this little booklet throws in the Declaration of Independence as well.

All of this made me curious about how many editions of the Constitution currently appear in Federal documents of various sorts. It turns out there are quite a few.

Note: This is a totally unscientific and partial survey based on what I found in our online bookstore.

For those who can’t get enough of the Constitution and its interpretation, there’s the Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation, published every 10 years or so and weighing in at an imposing 9 pounds, six ounces, not counting the supplements issued to keep it up to date.  If you can’t wait to start reading, you can find it here.

For those of us who like to contemplate history’s “might have beens,” you can’t do better than The Constitution of the United States of America as Amended; Unratified Amendments; Analytical Index, which, in addition to the text of the Constitution, details about the ratification of each amendment to the Constitution, and an exhaustive index, discusses six other amendments that were submitted to the states for ratification but not adopted. You can read them here and find out which unratified amendment was the only one actually signed by the President.

Naturally, the Constitution is also included in the procedural manuals of the Senate and the House of Representatives. And don’t forget Interpreting Old Ironsides: An Illustrated Guide to the USS Constitution – oh, wait, that’s a different kind of vessel of democracy.

I think I’ve made my point, and I haven’t even touched on everything in our online bookstore, let alone what you could find through the vast resources of the Federal Depository Library Program. Maybe someone can put a list together before the Fourth of July…


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