Presidents’ Day Publications

February 15, 2019

Presidents’ Day is an American holiday celebrated on the third Monday in February. This year it will take place on February 18. The holiday was initially established in 1885 to recognize President George Washington. Now, it serves as a day to remember and celebrate all U.S. presidents, both past and present. Some states require that schools teach children about the U.S. presidents in the days leading up to Presidents’ Day.

For those of us who no longer go to school, it’s up to us to take the time this Presidents’ Day to learn about the presidents and remember all their great achievements. The Public Papers of the Presidents series, produced by the Office of the Federal Register within National Archives and Records Administration, are a great way to do this. The Public Papers historical collection of primary source documents include public messages, statements, and speeches of the Presidents. They can be purchased online here.

Appreciate the “Father of our Country,” George Washington, with Washington’s Farewell Address to the People of the United States. His Farewell address to Congress and the American people began:

Friends, and Fellow-Citizens: The period for a new election of a Citizen, to Administer the Executive government of the United States, being not far distant, and the time actually arrived, when your thoughts must be employed in designating the person, who is to be cloathed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprise you of the resolution I have formed, to decline being considered among the number of those, out of whom a choice is to be made.

As one of the founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson made significant achievements for our country, including almost doubling our nation’s territory through the Louisiana Purchase. Learn more about Jefferson in Jefferson Memorial: Interpretive Guide to Thomas Jefferson Memorial. This handbook from the National Park Service describes the Jefferson Memorial and includes a biography of Thomas Jefferson.

It wouldn’t be Presidents’ Day without a mention of Honest Abe, one of our country’s most highly regarded presidents. Check out Abraham Lincoln’s Journey to Greatness from the National Park Service. This handbook presents a description and history of the Lincoln Memorial and a biography of the man it commemorates.

Interested in what it’s like to be in an intelligence meeting with the president? Getting To Know the President by John Helgerson describes the critical process of information sharing between the Intelligence Community (IC) and the Chief Executive, the President of the United States, starting as a presidential candidate. Since 1952, the CIA, and now the Intelligence Community as a whole, has provided presidential candidates and presidents-elect with intelligence briefings during their campaigns and transitions. These briefings have helped presidents be as well informed as possible on international developments from the day they take office.

First published in 1996 and now revised and updated to include accounts of intelligence support to candidates and presidents-elect in the three elections between then and 2004, Helgerson’s study provides unique insights into the mechanics and content of the briefings, the interaction of the participants, and the briefings’ effect on the relationships presidents have had with their intelligence services.

Our country is lucky to have had some amazing leaders. Without their vision and dedication, our nation wouldn’t be what it is today. Happy Presidents’ Day!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


Constitution Day September 17th

September 14, 2018

September 17th is Constitution Day. America celebrates this day to commemorate when delegates came together in Philadelphia at the Constitutional Convention in 1787 and signed the U.S. Constitution into law. However, it wasn’t until 2004 that the holiday took on the full name it bears today.  In 2004, Senator Robert Byrd passed an amendment renaming the holiday “Constitution Day and Citizenship Day,” which requires public schools and institutions to provide information on the history of the country’s Constitution.

The Constitution is often called a living document since it can be amended through a governmental process. The process for amending the Constitution can be found in the Constitution itself. And it can often take time to add an amendment, a process the founders developed as an attempt to ensure the power remained with the people.

The U.S. Government Bookstore offers a number of Federal titles describing the contents of the Constitution and associated documents. Here are but a few:

Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence (Pocket Edition) A pocket-size booklet containing the complete text of these two core documents of American democracy, the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence. House Document 112-129. 25th edition. Use this easy to read way to stay connected with the principles that have made America a bastion of democracy throughout its history.

Civics and Citizenship Toolkit The Toolkit contains immigration and civics publications, handbooks, and a quick start guide with ideas for use. It is designed for new and experienced organizations and may be used to:

  • Provide basic information to the immigrant community;
  • Develop content for classes;
  • Train staff and volunteers

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Ed Kessler is a Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication and Information Sales program office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Visiting Massachusetts

August 2, 2018

Today we have a very special stop in our summer travels around America. Home to several Founding Fathers and other valiant colonists, this is where revolution began. If you listen closely enough, you can still hear Paul Revere yelling “The British are coming!” And with a little imagination, you can see the Sons of Liberty dumping tea into the harbor. Travel back to a time with cobblestone streets, restored tea ships, colonial meeting houses and gaslight streetlamps. Come on travelers, button your waistcoats and pull on your breeches. We’re heading to New England to get a little history lesson in the charming and historic state of Massachusetts!

Not many U.S. cities can trace their origins as far back as Boston, the capital of Massachusetts. While other cities built over their historic structures, Bostonians preserved buildings from which the very essence of the American Revolution emanates, even to this day. Boston and the American Revolution from the GPO Bookstore describes Boston at the time of the American Revolution. It includes sections on Boston artists and artisans, The Boston Massacre, The Boston Tea Party, and historic sites in Boston. Like to be efficient in your travels? Lace up your walking shoes for a 2.5-mile stroll on the Freedom Trail®, which guides its followers to 16 different nationally significant historical sites via a red brick path. You’ll be led to Boston Common, Old Corner Book Store, Bunker Hill Monument and many other authentic sites along the way. Included on the trail is the USS Constitution, the oldest commissioned warship still afloat, also known as “Old Ironsides”, at the historic Charlestown Navy Yard. Want to know more about this shipyard? Charlestown Navy Yard from the GPO Bookstore tells the story of the 175-year history of Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston, the evolution of shipbuilding technology, the vessels it built and repaired, and the workers who made them seaworthy.

If you’re interested in seaports (or the finer things in life), head northeast a bit to Salem, Massachusetts, which was the leader in the Far Eastern luxuries trade in its prime. Salem: Maritime Salem in the Age of Sail provides a history of the port’s seafaring era in the late 18th and early 19th centuries and a guide to the sites of Salem. The handbook describes the goods that fueled the trade, including tea, West Indies molasses and sugar, Arabian coffee, European cheese and cloth, and fine silks from China. The historic buildings, wharves, and reconstructed tall ship at Salem Maritime tell the stories of the sailors, Revolutionary War privateers, and merchants who brought the riches of the Far East to America.

While there is no single birthplace of industry, Lowell, Massachusetts, a textile mill city, was one of the very first American cities with innovative textile technology and an urban working class, including young women, marking the beginning of a new American life. Lowell: The Story of an Industrial City tells the story of America’s first large-scale planned industrial community. In the handbook you’ll find paintings, maps, drawings and black and white photographs of the city that transformed America with its mechanized manufacturing. When visiting, check out one of Lowell’s most moving monuments, a group of 20 bronze bricks laid in the sidewalk that leads to Boott Mills, which was a part of the group of cotton mills built in 1835 alongside a power canal system.

We hope you learned a lot and had some fun while at it in the great state of Massachusetts. The best is yet to come! Stay tuned for more adventure in GPO’s Summer Travel Series.

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: Seeing Stars

GPO Summer Travel Series: Cave Dwellers, Fossil Finders and Dinosaurs Galore

GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


Light Up Your Independence Day with These Historic Posters

June 26, 2018

The Fourth of July is easily one of the most anticipated holidays in America. It’s part of what makes summertime so darn sweet. And who can blame us? What’s more fun than a day of bobbing up and down over our nation’s shining seas while the smell of saltwater and sunscreen lingers in the air? It’s a day when messy watermelon hands are welcomed and our tummies are happily full from hamburgers and hot dogs. And no doubt, nothing beats the feeling that overwhelms us as each firework shoots into the warm night air, lights up in a blinding sparkle, and gradually drips away like a chandelier in the sky.

But with all the soirees and excitement of the Fourth, it’s easy to go the whole day without really thinking twice about why we’re doing all these fun activities. So this Independence Day, order posters from GPO’s Bookstore that will help remind you of the meaning and origin of this important day. The poster Continental Soldier in the War for American Independence gives detailed information about how the infantry fought, who the army commanders were, and the nearly impossible conditions American soldiers endured. Philadelphia, 1776 offers detailed information about Philadelphia, including its intellectual awakening of the Enlightenment, its budding architecture, and its economic prosperity, during the Revolutionary War.

Give your July 4th party that little extra dash of patriotism with these two posters. You and your guests may feel just a little more grateful for your freedom when you do. And while you’re at it, don’t forget to order one for the kid in your life to hang in their room.

Let freedom ring!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

May 21, 2018

The kids are out of school, the sun is blazing and the suitcases are packed. Summer has returned in all her glory, which means it’s time to travel. And this season, we’re bringing you our GPO Summer Travel Series. We’ll provide you with places to go, things to do and, of course, resources from the GPO Bookstore to help you plan, so you can make the most of your travels.

If you live in the United States (or really anywhere for that matter), a trip to our nation’s capital is a must. There are endless exciting things to do in DC.; so here are just a few ideas and resources to help you plan a trip you won’t forget.

Start your journey in DC by taking a stroll around the U.S. Capitol. On a nice day, you’ll find the area filled with everyone from students on field trips, to engaged citizens peacefully protesting, to working men and women in fancy business suits. You never know who you may bump into – be on the lookout for Members of Congress! Order the Congressional Pictorial Directory so you can address the Congressmen and women by name … and maybe ask them to take a selfie … if you spot them out and about.

Just a short walk from the U.S. Capitol, stop and smell the roses (and lots of other plants) at the U.S. Botanic Garden. Go in prepared with A Botanic Garden for the Nation from the GPO Bookstore. It includes full-color photos of the building and plants as well as helpful information such as how to read a plant label at the Botanic Garden and a map of both the Conservatory building and Bartholdi Park outside.

Next, it’s time to see what it’s like to live like the POTUS. Requests for a tour of The White House can be submitted through one’s Member of Congress. If you’re bringing along any junior rangers, make sure you’ve got The White House Junior Ranger Activity Guide Book. It’s packed with activities that teach children about the history of The White House.

Depending on the time of year, you may be able to stroll among a wonderland of blossoming cherry trees that border the Tidal Basin and frame the Jefferson Memorial. Before you go, make sure to have in hand this National Park Service Handbook that describes the Jefferson Memorial and includes a biography of Thomas Jefferson. The National Park Service also offers a handbook on the Lincoln Memorial.

Take a break from the city life and get your nature on at Rock Creek Park! A Photographer’s Path: Images of National Parks Near the Nation’s Capital from GPO’s Bookstore includes a collection of colorful photographs from the park as well as other natural and historic sites in the Greater Washington DC area.

And last but certainly not least, don’t forget to visit the history exhibit on the first floor of the Government Publishing Office during the week. Not to toot our own horn, but you’ll be amazed to see historic materials such as White House menus, inauguration invitations, hand bookbinding tools and more.

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


National Vietnam War Veterans Day – March 29

March 29, 2018

On March 29, 1973, President Richard Nixon welcomed home the last of the combat military members from the Vietnam War. In honor of that day, we now celebrate their return and the sacrifices our soldiers made to serve our nation proudly overseas. The U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) offers access to the Vietnam War Veterans Recognition Act of 2017, which designated March 29 as Vietnam War Veterans Recognition Day, through the Catalog of U.S. Government Publications (CGP).

GPO’s govinfo offers the original Presidential Proclamation for Vietnam Veterans Day in 1974. As well as several other items from Congressional Records during the period.

The Vietnam War era saw the American citizens sick of decades of foreign wars, and who blamed the soldiers who fought them upon their return. Because of this unfavorable environment, the Vietnam War Veterans waited decades for their sacrifices to be formally recognized.

More than 2.7 million Americans served in uniform in Vietnam, with more than 58,000 of those service members killed during the war. The Tet Offensive played an important role in weakening U.S. public support for the war in Vietnam.

In January of 1968, during the lunar new year (or “Tet”) holiday, North Vietnamese and communist Viet Cong forces launched a coordinated attack against a number of targets in South Vietnam.

The U.S. and South Vietnamese militaries sustained heavy losses before finally repelling the communist assault. This was widely considered the final straw in an already unpopular American war, and led to the withdrawal of all American forces a few years later.

GPO has printed several publications throughout the years that illustrate the intricacies of this contested war.

GPO’s Government Bookstore offers many publications that can help you pay homage to this unique history. Some of those include:

  • Combat Operations: Staying the Course, October 1967-December 1968 describes the twelve-month period when the Viet Cong and their North Vietnamese allies embarked on a new and more aggressive strategy that shook the foundations of South Vietnam and forced the United States to reevaluate its military calculations in Southeast Asia. Hanoi’s general offensive-general uprising brought the war to South Vietnam’s cities for the first time and disrupted the allied pacification program that was just beginning to take hold in some rural areas formerly controlled by the Communists. For the enemy, however, those achievements came at a staggering cost in manpower and material; more importantly, the Tet offensive failed to cripple the South Vietnamese government or convince the United States to abandon its ally. As the dust settled from the Viet Cong attacks, President Lyndon B. Johnson ordered his military commanders to press ahead with their current strategy unchanged apart from some short-term tactical adjustments and a modest increase in the U.S. troop deployment. His decision to stay the course seemed to bear fruit as the allies repaired their losses and then forged new gains throughout the summer and autumn of 1968. Even so, the allied situation at the end of this period appeared to be only marginally better than it had been in late 1967; the peace talks in Paris had stalled, and American public opinion had turned decisively against the war.
  • Melvin Laird and the Foundation of the Post-Vietnam Military, 1969-1973 . Melvin Laird became President Richard Nixon’s secretary of defense in January 1969. His challenging agenda included two goals: withdrawing the U.S. military from Vietnam and reshaping U.S. the armed forces for the future. He worked toward ending the inequitable draft system and replacing it with an all-volunteer force of regulars supported by National Guard and Reserve components. Laird’s tenure was also marked by battles with Congress and the administration over the defense budget and the antiballistic military system as well as efforts to strengthen alliances with NATO, East Asian allies, and Israel.
  • Advice and Support: The Final Years, 1965-1973 . In Advice and Support: The Final Years, 1965-1973, Jeffrey J. Clarke describes the U.S. Army advisory effort to the South Vietnamese armed forces during the period when the U.S. commitment in Southeast Asia was at its peak. The account encompasses a broad spectrum of activities at several levels, from the physically demanding work of the battalion advisers on the ground to the more sophisticated undertakings of senior military officers at the highest echelons of the American military assistance command in Saigon.
  • U.S. Army Campaigns of the Vietnam War: Taking the Offensive, October 1966-September 1967 . Taking the Offensive, October 1966–September 1967, by Glenn F. Williams, begins with a discussion of Operation ATTLEBORO in Tay Ninh Province. The largest allied operation to date in the war, ATTLEBORO forced the 9th PLAF Division to abandon its attack on Suoi Da Special Forces camp and cost over 1,000 enemy lives. Additional action in War Zone C, including Operations CEDAR FALLS, JUNCTION CITY, and JUNCTION CITY II, highlight the U.S. Army effort to disrupt the network of camps and supply stores of the North Vietnamese main force units through ground and air assault. Operations in Binh Dinh Province — THAYER I, THAYER II, PERSHING, and LEJUNE — continued to inflict heavy losses on the enemy. The efforts of the U.S. Army throughout Vietnam during this time allowed for growing political stability in South Vietnam leading up to the 3 September 1967 election. This pamphlet contains twelve maps and fifteen illustrations.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Scott Pauley is a Writer and Editor in GPO’s Library Services and Content Management offices.

 


Black History Month

February 16, 2018

Since President Gerald R. Ford first officially recognized Black History Month during America’s Bicentennial celebration, the United States and its Government have recognized the incredible achievements of African-American citizens throughout its history. However, the origins of Black History Month stretch nearly 50 years prior to that event.

In 1926, Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History announced that they would be celebrating the second week of February as Negro History Week. They chose this particular week in honor of the birthdays of both Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln.

Over the next several years, the event grew, due in large part to the involvement of schools, until in 1969 the concept of a Black History Month was proposed at Kent State University in Kent, Ohio. The first recorded celebration of Black History Month occurred the next year, 1970, and from there was spread throughout colleges and universities picking up momentum in public opinion until Ford officially recognized it six years later.

The history of accomplishments, achievements, and innovations of African-Americans throughout our Nation’s history is vast and diverse. The U.S. Government Publishing Office (GPO) has printed several publications throughout the years that highlight those triumphs.

GPO offers access to several items that can help your organization pay homage to this unique history. The U.S. Government Bookstore offers several titles about this topic. Some of those include:

  • Underground Railroad This National Park Service handbook describes the many ways that blacks took to escape slavery in the southern United States before the Civil War. It includes stories of famous African American women, such as Harriet Tubman, who served in the Union Army as a nurse, spy, and scout, and Sojourner Truth, who helped recruit black troops for the Union Army.
  • Black Americans in Congress, 1870-2007 (Paperback Edition) – Black Americans in Congress, 1870-2007 provides a comprehensive history of the more than 120 African Americans who have served in the United States Congress from 1870 through 2007. Individual profiles are introduced by contextual essays that explain major events in Congressional and U.S. history. It is illustrated with many portraits, photographs, and charts. Questions that are answered include: How many African Americans have served in the U.S. Congress? How did Reconstruction, the Great Migration, and the post-World War II civil rights movement affect black Members of Congress? Who was the first African American to chair a Congressional committee?
  • Freedom by the Sword: The U.S. Colored Troops, 1862-1867 (Paperback) – Freedom by the Sword tells the story of the Colored Troops recruitment, organization, and service. The broad focus is on every theater of the Civil War and its concentration on what black soldiers actually contributed to Union victory. It examines the Colored Troops’ formation, training, and operations during the entire span of their service and in every theater of the war in which they served. It underscores the unique nature of their contributions both to Union victory and to their own liberation.

GPO also offers free access to H.J. Res. 12, which designated February 1993 as National Black History Month. Through govinfo.gov, you can find access to several occasions of Congress celebrating Black History Month and other related topics discussed on the House and Senate floors.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Click on the Links: For the free resources, click on the links above in the blog post.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Scott Pauley is a Writer and Editor in GPO’s Library Services and Content Management offices.


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