Fourth of July

June 30, 2017

“Taxation without representation”; the battle cry in America’s Thirteen Colonies when forced to pay taxes to England’s King George III despite having no representation in the British Parliament. As dissatisfaction grew, British troops were sent to quell the growing movement toward rebellion. Repeated attempts by Colonists to resolve the crisis without military conflict proved fruitless.

On June 11, 1776, the Colonies’ Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia to form a committee to draft a document formally severing ties with Great Britain. The committee included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston. Jefferson, who was considered the strongest and most eloquent writer, crafted the original draft document. The Continental Congress officially adopted a final version July 4, 1776.

How do you celebrate our freedom? With just hot dogs and burgers and fireworks? You might want to consider the hundreds of thousands of Americans now serving overseas to protect our way of life while we relax in the yard or at the beach this holiday weekend.

Get involved as they are. Take a step forward in understanding how America came to be, or read how our ever-vigilant military leaders give advice and counsel to our nation’s leaders. Reading to open the eyes of all Americans to the challenges we must face as a nation bound together as one.

Declaration of Independence and Constitution of the United States

A pocket-size booklet containing the complete text of these two core documents of American democracy: the Declaration of Independence and Constitution of the United States.

The Citizen’s Almanac: Fundamental Documents, Symbols, and Anthems of the United States U.S.

This pro-Americana booklet has been primarily designed for naturalized citizens as they enter into citizenship life within the United States of America.  The Citizen’s Almanac contains information on the history, people, and events that have brought us where we are today as a beacon of hope and freedom to the world. The contents of this booklet will serve as a constant reminder of the important rights and responsibilities immigrants will now have as a U.S. citizen.

Charting a Course: Strategic Choices for a New Administration Defense Dept., National Defense University

The new administration takes office in a time of great complexity. Our new President faces a national security environment shaped by strong currents: globalization; the proliferation of new, poor, and weak states, as well as non-state actors; an enduring landscape of violent extremist organizations; slow economic growth; the rise of China and a revanchist Russia; a collapsing Middle East; and a domestic politics wracked by division and mistrust. While in absolute terms the Nation and the world are safer than in the last century, today the United States finds itself almost on a permanent war footing, engaged in military operations around the world.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Ed Kessler is a Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication and Information Sales program office.


Bill of Rights at 225: A Guarantee for the People

December 14, 2016

9780160514234295It has been said that the Declaration of Independence was the promise; the Constitution was the fulfillment. Then you might say that the Bill of Rights was the affirmation. On December 15, 2016 those enduring first ten amendments to the Constitution turn 225 years old.

GPO makes available a pocket copy of The Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence that includes the celebrated Bill of Rights.

Since they were ratified in 1791, that compact collection of amendments have become some of the most talked about text in history. Before their guarantees were plainly enumerated in the Constitution, there was a rumbling fear of the tyrannical actions of government. The concern grew loud enough to stall the Constitution’s ratification.

It all centered on the contentious tug between Federalists and Anti-Federalists. The Federalists believed an official declaration of individual rights was unnecessary. The Anti-Federalists had little confidence in strong centralized government to safeguard liberties of the governed. They simply would not ratify the Constitution without a “bill of rights.”

In response, James Madison presented a list of amendments that would follow Article VII of the Constitution. His list placed prohibitions on government power and enshrined as inalienable rights the self-evident truths invoked in preceding documents.

bill-of-rightsThe amendments required approval from the House, Senate, and all state legislatures. Virginia was the last to ratify. Finally, on December 15, 1791, the Bill of Rights became part of the Constitution. Without the Bill of Rights, the Constitution might never have been ratified.

Although the phrase itself does not appear explicitly in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights is a foundational document that has lived long and large. Because of it, fundamental freedoms such as religion, speech, and due process of law are formally protected within the supreme law of the land.

Together, the Bill of Rights and Constitution are the slow-burning coals of a quiet revolution, a steady progression to improve the quality of American life. They secure individual liberties and the spirit of popular sovereignty extolled in the phrase “we the people.” Bill of Rights Day is as good a time as any for “we the people” to re-read them.

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Chelsea Milko is a Public Relations Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations Office.


Celebrate America’s Independence

June 24, 2016

Start with the U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence

In celebration of our nation’s independence there’s no better time for you, your family, or school children to own and read these historic documents. It’s easy to forget how wise our forefathers were in creating the foundation of our freedoms. The documents they authored have endured; for example, the Declaration of Independence is 240 years old. Words so beautifully crafted in the late eighteenth century that still speak with power, eloquence, and relevance today.

In time for Fourth of July, GPO offers the pocket size booklet of the U.S. Constitution and Declaration of Independence, including complete text.

027-002-00540-6Owning this historic set of Americana has never been easier or more affordable – only $1.50/set! And, while the kids are out of school, consider giving these documents to your own kids and their friends to read. Celebrate our written foundation of freedom by sitting down with your children or class and reading both documents line-by-line.

Get to know America’s foundational documents so that you’ll have another reason to chant “USA-USA-USA.”

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

 Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Ed Kessler is a Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication and Information Sales program office.


Bill of Rights Day

December 15, 2015

It has been said that the Declaration of Independence was the promise; the Constitution was the fulfillment. Then you might say that the Bill of Rights was the affirmation. Today, December 15, those enduring first ten amendments to the Constitution are 224 years old. GPO makes available a pocket copy of The Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence that includes the celebrated Bill of Rights.

052-071-01545-1Since they were ratified in 1791, that compact collection of amendments have become some of the most talked about text in history. Before the guarantees of the Bill of Rights were plainly enumerated in the Constitution, there was a rumbling fear of the tyrannical actions of government. In response, James Madison authored a list of amendments requiring approval from the House, Senate, and all states. His list enshrined as inalienable rights the self-evident truths invoked in preceding documents.

Although the phrase itself does not appear explicitly in the Constitution, The Bill of Rights is a foundation stone of a document that has lived long and large. Because of it, fundamental freedoms such as religion, speech, and due process of law are formally protected within the supreme law of the land.

The Declaration of Independence, Constitution, and Bill of Rights are three extraordinary documents. They are the slow-burning coals of a quiet revolution, a steady progression to improve the quality of American life. Together they secure individual liberties and safeguard the spirit of popular sovereignty extolled in the phrase “we the people.” Now is as good a time as any for “we the people” to re-read them.

How do I get the pocket edition of the Constitution of the United States and the Declaration of Independence?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Our guest blogger is Chelsea Milko, Public Relations Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations Office.


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