Nature Photography Day

June 12, 2019

Do you need some inspiration for your Instagram account? You’re in luck. June 15 is designated Nature Photography Day. According to the North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA), the day is meant to promote the enjoyment of nature photography, and to explain how images are used to advance the cause of conservation and protect plants, wildlife, and landscapes.

If you’re not sure what to take a picture of, flip through A Photographer’s Path from the Department of the Interior and National Park Service to get started. The book includes a collection of images from photographer Thomas Paradis that highlight nature and history in the Greater Washington, D.C. area, with photos from parks in Washington, D.C., West Virginia, Maryland and Virginia. Photographs of streamside ferns and queen snakes at Catoctin Mountain Park, dew drops on Magnolias at National Capital Parks – East, white trout lilies at George Washington Memorial Parkway, and a lone butterfly flying over a crowd of bur-marigolds, will leave you in awe of the elegant beauty of nature – and get you thinking about what you might want to capture. Is it the squirrel that scurries around your backyard, that waterfall you’ve been wanting to hike, or millions of stars twinkling on a clear night? This publication, in particular, takes you through trails, aquatic gardens, grasslands, tunnels, forts, streams, and forests, and would make the perfect coffee table book. The photos are part of the National Park Service’s Inventory and Monitoring program, which aims to communicate the significance of park natural resources. Check out the book for a full list of the 15 parks featured, then choose one to visit yourself!

Swallowtail perched on branch Manassas National Park, from A Photographer’s Path.

So you got a stunning nature shot that you’re really feeling good about? Post it to your favorite social media! You can also frame it and give it as an inexpensive gift to friends or family. Or, if you’re feeling extra creative, make a nature box. In it, keep your best photos, along with collected items like leaves, dandelions, twigs, seashells, or unique rocks you find as you go. If you have kids in your life, they will love helping out with a project like this.

The best part about Nature Photography Day is that you get to be in nature! Whether it be with kids, a grandparent, a friend, a significant other, a pet, or just yourself, make a day of exploring and studying flora and fauna. We want to hear from you! Where will you be heading this Nature Photography Day to capture the perfect shot? We hope to see you on June 15 in the great outdoors.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


More Trees Please: Publications for Arbor Day

April 23, 2019

Do you remember planting a tree at school on Arbor Day when you were younger? We sure do! Here’s a little background on the holiday that recognizes some of our most underrated friends – trees!

In 1872, Nebraska newspaper editor and nature-lover J. Sterling Morton proposed a tree-planting holiday called “Arbor Day” at a meeting of the State Board of Agriculture. Morton believed that adding more trees would make the newly formed Nebraska Territory more attractive to settlers. On April 10, 1872, the first Arbor Day celebration took place, and more than one million trees were planted in Nebraska. In 1885, Arbor Day became a legal holiday in Nebraska, and it only felt right that the holiday would be observed on Morton’s birthday, April 22. During the 1870s, other states passed legislation to commemorate Arbor Day, and it became a tradition for school children to plant trees on the day. Today all 50 states celebrate Arbor Day. It is primarily observed on the last Friday in April, but the date varies from state to state depending on what time of year is best to plant trees. Morton went on to serve as the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture under President Grover Cleveland, and several U.S. presidents have proclaimed a national Arbor Day during their presidencies.

This Arbor Day, get to know the trees around you and how we can keep them healthy and protected. Read up on tree species, forest ecosystems, and the life cycle of trees with these books that will have you shouting “more trees please!”

Why Would Anyone Cut a Tree Down details the life cycle of trees and explains how trees work as a renewable source. This beautifully illustrated book will help teach kids from a young age to respect and appreciate trees and all they do for us.

The National Individual Tree Species Atlas covers each tree species in the United States and exactly where each species is likely to grow or not grow. This work complete with illustrations will benefit silviculturists, foresters, geneticists, researchers, botanists, wildlife habitat biologists, and landscape ecologists. In other words, this atlas is excellent for anyone involved in natural resources management or monitoring impacts of climate change … or someone who just loves visiting America’s forests and landscapes!

Does your home seem to have some trees that don’t look healthy? You’re not alone. How to Recognize Hazardous Defects in Trees from the Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Forest Service was created to help homeowners and land managers like you recognize hazardous defects in trees. The publication suggests possible corrective actions to restore trees to good health, so the trees on your property continue to live their best lives.

Imagine trying to quantify all the benefits of trees. Doesn’t sound easy, right? Southern forests provide a variety of critical ecosystem services, from the purification of water and air to recreational opportunities for millions of people. Trees at Work is a guide from the Department of Agriculture and U.S. Forest Service that proposes a sound approach to quantifying the services provided by these ecosystems.

On a fruitful note, Fruitful Legacy from the Department of the Interior and National Park Service provides information about the development of the most common types of orchards and fruit trees in the United States.

Whether it’s a pretty pink Japanese Cherry Blossom, a venerable Weeping Willow, or a Giant Sequoia, trees are without a doubt one of the most magnificent parts of our world. Each tree has its own unique purpose on Earth. What’s your favorite type of tree and why? Let us know in the comments below and have a wonderful Arbor Day!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


National GIS Day

November 13, 2018

Wednesday, November 14 is National Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Day. The annual event celebrating technology and all of the benefits it has brought to the world of geography has been recognized since 1999.

GIS is a system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present spatial or geographic data. However, GIS can refer to a number of different technologies, processes, and methods.

This year’s theme is Discover the World through GIS, with a focus on demonstrating the real-world GIS applications that are making a difference in our society. GISday.com has several story maps available that allow users to experience the changes our world has undergone through the use of mapping. One in particular, 100 Years of the National Park Service, takes you on a chronological journey of the significant events in the establishment and growth of America’s unparalleled system of public parks.

The US Government Publishing Office (GPO) has a long history of working with Federal depository libraries to provide Government information, including maps and GIS data. On govinfo, GPO offers a snapshot of the Federal Register Volume 75, Issue 173, where the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of a final GIS tool and its user guide titled, “ICLUS v1.3 User’s Manual: ArcGIS Tools and Datasets for Modeling U.S. Housing Density Growth.”

GPO also offers access to several items that can help you celebrate this unique day, as the Government Bookstore offers several titles about this topic. Some of those include:

  • Washington: The Nation’s Capital  This handy pamphlet provides a color map of Washington, DC with all the major landmarks, memorials, monuments, and tourist attractions clearly marked, and folds up to fit easily in a pocket or purse.  It also features a timeline of important events with information about key historical sites on the other side, including the newest attractions, such as the new Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial.  Sold in packages of 100 copies only.
  • Rocky Mountain National Park (Map) Rocky Mountain National Park’s 415 square miles encompass and protect spectacular mountain environments. Enjoy Trail Ridge Road – which crests at over 12,000 feet including many overlooks to experience the subalpine and alpine worlds – along with over 300 miles of hiking trails, wildflowers, wildlife, starry nights, and fun times. The Rocky Mountain National Park map is a 1:50 000-scale topographic map.
  • National Park Service Centennial 1916-2016 (Map and Guide) – The National Park Service celebrated 100 years on August 5, 2016. This map shows locations of historic parks in celebration of the centennial for tourists to use as a guide.

GPO’s commitment to Keeping America Informed will continue to strive to provide access to Government information on all issues that affect the public in all aspects of their life.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Scott Pauley is a former Writer and Editor in GPO’s Library Services and Content Management office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: The Carolina Countryside

August 29, 2018

Well folks, we’ve traveled north, south, east and west. We’ve experienced the mountains, the cities, the coasts, the caves, the glades, the geysers, the forests and the canyons of our amazing nation. This summer has been one epic adventure after another. Now we’ve just got one more stop before the leaves start to change, the air turns crisp, and it’s back to the grind of setting the alarm, packing lunches and checking the kids’ homework. There’s only one place we can think of that has the ability to put our minds at ease before what is expected to be a bumpy ride back to reality. Pasturelands, ponds and peace, here we come. We’re about to get a taste of the simple life in the countryside of North Carolina.

Poet-author Carl Sandburg, who received two Pulitzer Prizes for his writing, once described poetry as “the achievement of the synthesis of hyacinths and biscuits.” According to his granddaughter Paula Steichen, this was descriptive of his own life at his home called Connemara where family horses fed on grain and hay left over from the goat herd. Sandburg enjoyed meandering around the farm, which was complete with a large vegetable garden, a berry patch, an orchard, chickens and hogs, and its nearby trails infused with wildflowers and mosses. The estate’s 247 acres (that’s about 187 football fields!) and view of the Blue Ridge Mountain Range in the distance provided Mr. Sandburg with quietude he needed for his writing. It’s no wonder his poems like the one titled “Prairie” were essentially anthems to the countryside. His love of the land became a common theme throughout his verses. But the countryside didn’t just inspire him to write. It also inspired song. According to his granddaughter, the family would gather after dinner to sing along while Sandburg played guitar and his daughter played the piano. She remembers, “The dining room was also a family room – a place to gather for conversation, song and fellowship.”

Ingrain yourself in the simple yet rich life of Carl Sandburg. The Carl Sandburg Home Official National Park Handbook, available at the GPO Bookstore, offers an introduction to the Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site in Flat Rock, North Carolina. In Part 1, Paula Steichen, granddaughter of Carl Sandburg, tells of the family life at Connemara. In Part 2 she presents a biographical essay on Mr. Sandburg and his works, detailing some of his incredible accomplishments, including receiving the Medal of Freedom from President Johnson in 1964. Part 3 of the handbook provides tourist information and reference materials for exploring the grounds which offered, as Mr. Sandburg would put it, some of the “universal things that are free to everybody.”

We hope the sloping pastures have you breathing a little more deeply and the rolling fields have got you feeling at one with nature. Now, the tide is coming in. We hiked at high elevations in Arizona. We indulged in clambake of Cape Cod. We watched lily pads float in Florida. We were humbled by redwoods of California. We admired bison in Wyoming. We stood where soldiers fell in Virginia. We smelled hyacinths and biscuits of North Carolina. And that’s not even the half of it. But most importantly, we heard the stories of the history, culture, wildlife, and people that make our country so great. Thank you for coming along for the ride.

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: Historic Virginia

GPO Summer Travel Series: Visiting Massachusetts

GPO Summer Travel Series: Seeing Stars

GPO Summer Travel Series: Cave Dwellers, Fossil Finders and Dinosaurs Galore

GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Historic Virginia

August 10, 2018

Hey there our tenacious tourists! How are you holding up? If this humidity hasn’t worn you out yet, come along! There are still a couple more places we want to take you in our Summer Travel Series. Don’t worry, they’re going to be super cool. Oh sorry, we mean super awesome. The heat isn’t letting up yet. We’re headed to the home of American Civil War action. It’s where Federal artillery dueled Confederate cannons, brigades formed, men hunkered down behind embankments, dismounted Confederate cavalrymen held their ground against thousands of Federals, and soldiers rescued wounded comrades. Virginia, we’re ready to experience all your history has to offer!

Our first stop is Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, located in south central Virginia between Richmond and Lynchburg. Appomattox Court House from the GPO Bookstore tells the story of Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House, which led to the conclusion of the Civil War. It also details the battles fought in the days before it. The book contains essays by three eminent historians on events leading up to the Civil War and the implications of Appomattox for the post-Civil War generation. You’ll learn interesting details of the Civil War you never knew before! For example, Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan’s most effective unit was a small group of clandestine horsemen who dressed up in Confederate uniforms and infiltrated Confederate lines to gain valuable information. Another fun fact? On the ride back to his headquarters from the McLean house, Ulysses S. Grant actually forgot to notify the War Department of the day’s events in the rush to finalize details of Lee’s surrender. The handbook also offers a tourist’s guide to the park and invites you to “imagine the activity of those April days when Lee’s veterans laid down their flags, stacked their weapons, and began the journey back to their homes.” All the restored and reconstructed buildings in Appomattox Court House National Historical Park are within easy walking distance and there is no established order you have to follow. So just walk around and take it all in.

Next we’re making our way to The Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. Fredericksburg Battlefields from the GPO Bookstore describes the Civil War battles fought in Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Court House and the condition of those battlefields today. Here, within 17 miles, more than 100,000 American soldiers fell in the midst of chaotic, bloody battles involving strategy and tactics beyond their understanding. Want a little taste of the chaos that ensued? Stonewall Jackson was badly wounded by the mistaken fire of his own troops. And Maj. Gen. Edward “Allegheny” Johnson used his cane as a weapon during the Battle at the Bloody Angle where hand-to-hand fighting raged for 20 hours along a curving portion of the line that came to be known as the “Bloody Angle.”

Now that was a history lesson if we’ve ever had one. Virginia might be one of our favorite stops yet. What’s been your favorite adventure so far this summer? Have you dangled your feet off a dock? Napped in a hammock? Gone for a bike ride? If not, keep living up the summer! Its suns are setting, its boardwalks are clearing and its days are fleeting. Until next time!

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: Visiting Massachusetts

GPO Summer Travel Series: Seeing Stars

GPO Summer Travel Series: Cave Dwellers, Fossil Finders and Dinosaurs Galore

GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Visiting Massachusetts

August 2, 2018

Today we have a very special stop in our summer travels around America. Home to several Founding Fathers and other valiant colonists, this is where revolution began. If you listen closely enough, you can still hear Paul Revere yelling “The British are coming!” And with a little imagination, you can see the Sons of Liberty dumping tea into the harbor. Travel back to a time with cobblestone streets, restored tea ships, colonial meeting houses and gaslight streetlamps. Come on travelers, button your waistcoats and pull on your breeches. We’re heading to New England to get a little history lesson in the charming and historic state of Massachusetts!

Not many U.S. cities can trace their origins as far back as Boston, the capital of Massachusetts. While other cities built over their historic structures, Bostonians preserved buildings from which the very essence of the American Revolution emanates, even to this day. Boston and the American Revolution from the GPO Bookstore describes Boston at the time of the American Revolution. It includes sections on Boston artists and artisans, The Boston Massacre, The Boston Tea Party, and historic sites in Boston. Like to be efficient in your travels? Lace up your walking shoes for a 2.5-mile stroll on the Freedom Trail®, which guides its followers to 16 different nationally significant historical sites via a red brick path. You’ll be led to Boston Common, Old Corner Book Store, Bunker Hill Monument and many other authentic sites along the way. Included on the trail is the USS Constitution, the oldest commissioned warship still afloat, also known as “Old Ironsides”, at the historic Charlestown Navy Yard. Want to know more about this shipyard? Charlestown Navy Yard from the GPO Bookstore tells the story of the 175-year history of Charlestown Navy Yard in Boston, the evolution of shipbuilding technology, the vessels it built and repaired, and the workers who made them seaworthy.

If you’re interested in seaports (or the finer things in life), head northeast a bit to Salem, Massachusetts, which was the leader in the Far Eastern luxuries trade in its prime. Salem: Maritime Salem in the Age of Sail provides a history of the port’s seafaring era in the late 18th and early 19th centuries and a guide to the sites of Salem. The handbook describes the goods that fueled the trade, including tea, West Indies molasses and sugar, Arabian coffee, European cheese and cloth, and fine silks from China. The historic buildings, wharves, and reconstructed tall ship at Salem Maritime tell the stories of the sailors, Revolutionary War privateers, and merchants who brought the riches of the Far East to America.

While there is no single birthplace of industry, Lowell, Massachusetts, a textile mill city, was one of the very first American cities with innovative textile technology and an urban working class, including young women, marking the beginning of a new American life. Lowell: The Story of an Industrial City tells the story of America’s first large-scale planned industrial community. In the handbook you’ll find paintings, maps, drawings and black and white photographs of the city that transformed America with its mechanized manufacturing. When visiting, check out one of Lowell’s most moving monuments, a group of 20 bronze bricks laid in the sidewalk that leads to Boott Mills, which was a part of the group of cotton mills built in 1835 alongside a power canal system.

We hope you learned a lot and had some fun while at it in the great state of Massachusetts. The best is yet to come! Stay tuned for more adventure in GPO’s Summer Travel Series.

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: Seeing Stars

GPO Summer Travel Series: Cave Dwellers, Fossil Finders and Dinosaurs Galore

GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Cave Dwellers, Fossil Finders and Dinosaurs Galore

July 20, 2018

Is it just us, or is the thought of dinosaurs roaming … and ruling … the Earth pretty mind-blowing? If you’re as captivated by the early days of Earth as we are, you’re going to love this next destination in our GPO Summer Travel Series. But first, all the prehistoric talk has got us feeling prehistoric ourselves. Let’s stop for some coffee. You’re going to want to be awake for this expedition … we’re on our way to Agate Fossil Beds National Monument in Nebraska!

Before we get there, order your Official National Park Handbook Agate Fossil Beds National Monument, Nebraska. It provides a glimpse of what life was like in North America 20 million years ago, long before the arrival of man, when now-extinct creatures roamed the land that we know as Nebraska. The handbook, brought to you by the National Park Service and Department of the Interior, explains why this land became part of the National Park System, what fossils are found there, and where this monument is located. It includes tips to visitors, a reading list, and information on other sites in the National Park System. The most numerous fossils found at Agate were the remains of the pony-sized rhinoceros Menoceras. The site is also known for fossils of the gazelle-like camel Stenomylus and the early horse Miohippus. The handbook provides sketches of and information on these early animals. In addition to fossils, the park has an extensive collection of Plains Indian art and artifacts, including a shirt from the famous Sioux chief, Red Cloud, who lived on the land in the 1800s.

Have we got you eager to find more fossils? Lucky for you, there are more than 230 other national parks that preserve fossils today! Junior Paleontologist Activity Book includes a map of those parks that preserve fossils across the United States. So take a look! Fossil finding adventures may be closer than you realize. This booklet also helps children ages 5 and up dig for clues as Paleontologists do. They’ll learn about ancient life, complete fun activities, and explore just some of the national parks that offer a look into the past. Play a game to learn about how fossils form and discover different fossil types such as vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. Plus, interested to know when the first fish or flower appeared on Earth? Read fascinating descriptions of the eras of geological time, all the way from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic Era.

Did you know caves are ideal places to preserve fossil remains for thousands or even millions of years? Grab your headlamps and helmets and get ready to be amazed by stalactites, stalagmites and cave-dwelling creatures. With the Junior Cave Scientist Activity Book, you and your family will explore a fascinating and fragile underground world, learn about the values of caves and karst landscapes, and complete fun educational activities. Etiquette isn’t just for the dinner table. Before your big cave expedition, read through this book so you (and your junior cave scientists) know how to practice proper cave etiquette. Yes, it’s a real thing! As the booklet points out, it’s important to never disturb the fossils you find while on a caving adventure. The book also provides useful tips on being cave safe. The National Park Service recommends going into a cave with not one, not two, but three reliable sources of light. It really is as dark as it seems in a cave!

Thanks for coming along the road to fossilization. Rest up and we’ll see you back here again for more summer travels.

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


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