Government Resources for Great Outdoors Month

June 9, 2020

June is designated as ’Great Outdoors Month.’ According to the Department of the Interior, you can celebrate this month by “getting out to America’s public lands and waters.” We here at GPO know how tough it’s been to stay at home this spring with the coronavirus pandemic, but one of the best things you can do for your mental health during this time is to get outside. And luckily, many of our national parks are beginning to partially or fully reopen.

The South Rim of the Grand Canyon in Arizona is now open for recreational access with some services. According to the National Park Service, day hiking is now permitted on rim and inner canyon trails, and some visitor facilities are open. Desert View and North Rim remain closed.

A Living Canyon: Discovering Life at the Grand Canyon from the GPO Bookstore describes the diverse wildlife of the Grand Canyon and how plants and animals are adapting as the global climate changes.

The rumors are true … high elevation is likely to affect you differently than your home environment. If you and other family members or friends aren’t used to hiking in high elevations, you’ll want to come extra prepared for hiking the Grand Canyon. Drink lots of water, take breaks if you need to, and protect your skin with sunscreen and hats.

Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado is open, but some facilities and areas remain closed due to COVID–19. According to the National Park Service, beginning June 4, Rocky Mountain National Park will require a timed entry permit or camping reservation to enter the park in a private vehicle between the hours of 6 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Rocky Mountain National Park (Map) from the GPO Bookstore covers the 415 square miles of spectacular mountain views. Use this map to find Trail Ridge Road, which crests at over 12,000 feet and offers many overlooks to experience the subalpine and alpine worlds, along with over 300 miles of hiking trails, wildflowers, wildlife, starry nights, and fun times.

If you live near Yellowstone National Park, you’re in luck. Yellowstone National Park opened its Montana entrances Monday, June 1 at 10 a.m. The Montana entrances include West Entrance (near West Yellowstone), North Entrance (near Gardiner), and Northeast Entrance (near Cooke City).

At Yellowstone, as Naturalist John Muir described it back in the 1880s, prepare to see “Nature at work as a chemist.” With more active geo-thermal features than the rest of the world, Yellowstone is wild and alive. Sure, you’ve heard of the famous Old Faithful. But altogether there are actually more than 10,000 thermal features at Yellowstone, including geysers, hot springs, mudpots, and fumaroles. Here, you’ll experience a rainbow of vivid colors as water flows from hot springs, starting with yellow, then orange and green. The unique activity in the park provides geologists with a glimpse into what goes on thousands of miles beneath the Earth’s surface. In all its bubbling and erupting wonder, Yellowstone has been regarded as a sacred place by the groups of people who have lived near it throughout time. In fact, it’s believed that early Native American visitors to Yellowstone left offerings at thermal features to show their respect.

Purchase the Yellowstone National Trip Planner 2020 to help you navigate the expansive park at over 30,000 square miles connecting land through the states of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. This handy 16-page pocket guide provides you and your family with all the essential details to help you plan for a memorable trip.

The GPO Bookstore has these and many other national park resources for you to explore. We hope everyone is staying safe and healthy during these unprecedented times. If you have the opportunity this June, visit a national park near you!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Holiday Gift Guide: Publications for the Avid Traveler

November 26, 2019

Joshua Tree National Park, NPS

The holidays are right around the corner! It’s time to stop distracting yourself with perfecting your hot chocolate recipe, hanging the stockings with care, and dashing through the snow, and begin the real work – shopping for gifts! GPO is here to help all season long with our 2019 holiday gift guide. Today, we’re discussing avid travelers. These happy nomads are perhaps some of the hardest people to shop for. Their free spirits are inspired by adventure, not material things! They bop from here to there with an insatiable wanderlust and a desire to discover new food, art, sceneries, and people.

The perfect place to start with a gift for a traveler? Think about where they’re headed to next and give them some resources to help them prepare! GPO offers Official National Park Handbooks for Yellowstone, Yosemite, the Everglades, Cape Cod, and so much more. From great geysers to canopies of trees to charming seashores, the traveler in your life will be in awe of these spectacular destinations. These handbooks, produced by the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service, offer endless information about the cultural and natural history of these National Parks, so the recipient of your well-thought out gift will be ready to tackle their next adventure. Along with any of these books, gift your favorite globetrotter with a special travel journal where they can write all about their journey and keep train tickets to memorable destinations or receipts for favorite foods they’ve tried around the globe.

The National Park System wall map poster shows the locations of parks in the National Park System. It was developed by the Publications Office at Harpers Ferry Center in response to the high volume of requests for an oversized version of the map of the National Park Service system. The map shows all 392 authorized units of the park system and measures 39 by 29 inches. Frame this poster as the perfect gift for anyone who loves the National Parks. Really want to go all out? Print and frame photos of your friend or family member on their travels so they can surround their poster with lots of personal pictures to remind them of their trips.

Treasured Landscapes showcases paintings, watercolors, sketches, and other works on paper from over 50 National Park Service museum collections. These works of art are seen together in this book for the first time to illustrate and tell the story of the Service’s first 100 years. Assembled to commemorate the National Park Service Centennial, 1916–2016, artworks capture the diversity of the national parks and Park Service collections, as well as the richness of artists’ encounters. They reflect the critical role that landscape art played in the establishment of the National Park Service. The works shown in the book capture awe-inspiring landscapes, honor individuals who have contributed to the nation’s identity, and commemorate inspiring American ideas and events.

Are you travelling somewhere exciting yourself? If so, be on the lookout for neat souvenirs for the avid traveler and add them to any of these publications for the perfect gift.

It can feel nearly impossible to find a good gift for someone who has seen so many parts of the world. When you start to get stressed, just think of the cozy crackle of the fire, or the jolly laughter of children making snow angels. Then, turn to GPO, of course! We hope this post helped give you a few ideas. Stay tuned for more gift ideas to come this holiday season. Happy gifting from GPO!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.

 


GPO Summer Travel Series: Glacier National Park

September 5, 2019

Going-to-the-Sun Road, NPS.

Summer is coming to a close. But there’s still one spot left on our bucket list. It might be last, but with its majestic alpines, spiritual falls, and shaggy-coated mountain goats, it is certainly not least. Bring your bug spray and pack away your snacks in case we spot a bear. Our last stop in our 2019 summer travels, nicknamed “Crown of the Continent” for its royal grandeur, is in Montana’s Rocky Mountains. We’re heading to one of our most scenic parks yet – Glacier National Park!

Okay, Junior Rangers, open your Junior Park Ranger Glacier National Park booklet! Your first challenge is to help park visitors leave no trace at the park. Let’s keep the park in pristine condition for the animals who live here and the people who visit after us. It’s essential to be wise about wildlife. Glacier is bear country, with both black bears and grizzly bears. Flip through your booklet to learn about how to hike with bears nearby and what every one of us can do to help wild animals survive in their natural habitats!

To get into the park, we’ll take a drive down Going-to-the-Sun Road, one of the main attractions of Glacier National Park. With views of peaked mountains, purple wildflowers, lush valleys, and Aspen groves, you’ll want to get your camera out for this part! Notice how clear the water is? The lakes here keep their enviable blue-green color because of the cold temperature of the water. Since most of the lakes don’t get above 50 degrees Fahrenheit at the surface, very few plankton grow here.

Time for a history lesson! The Salish, Kootenai, and Blackfeet peoples have been in and around the area of Glacier National Park for thousands of years. Once the settlers arrived, places were often renamed for the newcomers. Open your booklet to guess the native names for these places. Can you figure out the names of the digestive system of the buffalo, the waterfall where warrior woman and others went for spiritual guidance, and the mountain you need to be extra respectful of when visiting? Next, complete the rhymes to learn about how people moved through the area at different times throughout history, starting with the first Americans who traveled through the mountains in tribal bands. Once Glacier National Park was established in 1910, The Great Northern Railway company began to build hotels, trails, and of course, the railroad. This railroad provided transportation for those who wanted to travel West.

In 1932, Waterton-Glacier became the very first International Peace Park in the world. The park, which merged Canada’s Waterton Lakes National Park and America’s Glacier National Park, symbolized the longstanding friendship between Canada and the United States. Now, write about what peace means to you. Stop and listen — the sounds of the water crashing on the rocks or the croaky calls of a Clark’s Nutcracker here at Glacier might help you describe your definition of peace!

Did you know scientists have been studying the glaciers in this park for more than 100 years? Since then, Glacier National Park has lost many of its glaciers, and many are shrinking. In your booklet, connect the dots to see what Shepard Glacier looked like 100 years ago and what it looks like now. Let’s go on a Geology Hunt in the park. At Lake McDonald, there are rocks of all colors of the rainbow! The Kootenai Indians called Lake McDonald “Dancing Place” because they believed it to be an excellent place to sway, spin, and twirl. What geological evidence can you find here? Look out for different colored pebbles, rocks in the streams, and the peaks on top of the mountains. These mountains, along with the U-shaped valleys, were shaped by the glaciers long ago.

Not quite at reading age yet? No problem! The GPO Bookstore has still got you covered with the Pre-Reader Activity Guide for Glacier National Park’s Youngest Junior Rangers. This booklet is full of fun activities for Glacier’s littlest explorers.

Thank you for experiencing the splendor that is Glacier National Park with us. We hope you learned a lot and that Glacier rejuvenated you for the school year ahead. Stay wild, travelers!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Pecos National Historical Park

August 6, 2019

Mission Church and Convento

Thus far this summer we’ve experienced the aloha spirit of Hawaii, the falling waters of Yosemite, and even the golden badlands of Death Valley. You may be thinking there can’t possibly be any more to see. But our Nation is vast, with 58 national parks eagerly awaiting your adventure upon arrival. And our next park is full of rich culture and history. With a little imagination, you can still see this park’s original inhabitants weaving baskets from yucca plants and gathering around to tell the stories of their ancestors. Get ready to experience a big sky and open spaces at Pecos National Historical Park!

Before we head off for New Mexico, pick up the Pecos Junior Ranger Activity Book from the GPO Bookstore. This booklet lets kids explore the sites and history of Pecos National Historical Park, learn about the people, stories, and places of Pecos, and protect the park. They’ll start by interviewing a Park Ranger about their job. Before you know it, the kids in your crew will be living as the Pecos people once did – designing pottery, decoding messages in Morse Code, and creating a unique brand of cattle.

The booklet also serves as a guide for what to see and do at the park. The Ancestral Sites Trail will take us up through the Pecos Pueblo, which used to be a Native American community, and lead us to the Mission Church and Convento. Here, we will explore one of the reconstructed kivas, which were pit-houses used for religious ceremonies. You may notice that the structures are circular and have a hole in the middle. These holes represent the Pecos people’s connection to the underworld.

Using an ancient agricultural technique that originated in Mexico, the people of Pecos grew corn, beans, and squash and caught fish in the Pecos River. However, the Pecos people needed to trade with their neighboring tribes to prosper. In the booklet, readers will help the people from the Rio Grande Valley, and the Great Plains move their goods to the Pecos Pueblo to participate in the trade fair!

Did you know soldiers in the Civil War fought a Battle at Pecos? There’s still more to see! Next let’s hike the Battlefield Trail and explore the place where the Battle of Glorieta Pass, also known as the Gettysburg of the West, was fought. Though this pass is well-known for being a place of Civil War battle, humans have actually traveled on it for over 10,000 years!

Next, it’s off to Forked Lightning Ranch and Kozlowski’s Trading Post where travelers who made their way across the Santa Fe Trail stopped to purchase goods. Today the Trading Post is part of the Forked Lightning Ranch, the land along part of the Pecos River. According to the National Park Service, this land “has nourished and served the needs of the inhabitants and settlers of the region” for hundreds of years.

That’s all for Pecos. As always, thanks for coming along! We’re so glad we got to experience this park with you. What’s been your favorite park so far? Relive some of your old memories by searching “summer travel” on this blog. Rest up, and we will see you again soon for more travels!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Bandelier National Monument

July 10, 2019

River-carved valley landscape, Bandelier National Monument. NPS.

Welcome back, summer travelers. If historic caves, petroglyphs, and ceremonial grounds inspire you, get excited. Thousands of years ago, in what is now modern-day New Mexico, Ancestral Pueblo people built homes carved from volcanic tuff. Today, the National Park Service protects the structures and cultural architecture at this next destination. So, what are you waiting for? Mentally prepare to climb lots of ladders, and let’s pay tribute to the place that preserves ancient Ancestral Pueblo dwellings—Bandelier National Monument!

With activities for kids from first grade to seventh grade, Bandelier National Monument Junior/Deputy Ranger Booklet is just what you need to make sure your trip to this National Monument is an educational adventure. First things, first! Together, let’s learn to respect and protect the park with a fill-in-the-blank challenge. Little Junior Rangers will be challenged to cross off things they see at the park – like cliff dwellings, the village, and ladders. To spot some of the ladders, we’ll head to the Alcove House. A series of four ladders and stone stairs make up the 140-foot climb to get to the house. Archeologists believe this house was once home to about 25 people. Another trail with ladders will lead to the Ancestral Pueblo village of Tsankawi. Here you’ll find distinct paths that the Ancestral Pueblo people themselves used – and experience the views of the mesa as they did thousands of years ago. Did you know human presence in the area goes back over 11,000 years?

Next, Junior Rangers will be challenged to interview a Ranger at the park. And once they climb the ladder into a Cavate Home, readers will be challenged to decide the best spot in the home to build a fire, store food, and sleep. Now, we’re going to take a stab at being an archeologist! Junior Rangers will look at structures, such as Big Kava and Tyuonyi ruins, from Ancestral Pueblo times, and think about what questions they would need to ask about each of the structures to determine their uses. Remember, the Ancestral Pueblo people lived here from about 1150 CE to 1550 CE, so they didn’t have the convenience of modern technology like we do today.

Another neat thing to check out at Bandelier? The Long House! These cliff dwellings were three to four stories tall. Here, you’ll see hundreds of petroglyphs, or carved drawings. Painted Cave, which can be accessed from the Bandelier Visitor Center or the Dome Trailhead, is a great place to observe even more of these illustrations.

In a valuable lesson about protecting species, the National Park Service booklet discusses animals that used to live amongst the Ancestral Pueblo people but can no longer be found in the park today. The booklet asks children which species they believe could be reintroduced to the park, as well as what they can do to help keep other species from disappearing from their original habitat.

We’re impressed with how much you were able to see at the park! Now that we have finished exploring for today, let’s head back to the visitor center and give the booklet to a Ranger to complete your challenge.

Awesome work. We hope you enjoyed getting a taste of life as an Ancestral Pueblo person as well as learning about the importance of protecting and respecting places we visit, especially ones with rich culture and relics that we want to keep safe. Summer is just getting started, and so are we. We can’t wait to take you to our next destination. Keep following along!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: A Visit to Death Valley

July 5, 2019

Summer is heating up, and it’s about to get even hotter. Located near the border of California and Nevada in the Great Basin, this next stop in our summer travel series is the hottest place on Earth. On July 10, 1913, the temperature in this National Park was 134°F. Fill up your jugs of water, strap on your hiking boots, and pack your water misting fans. Summer travelers, we hope you’re ready for Death Valley National Park in Inyo County, California!

Death Valley National Park Visitor Guide from the National Park Service (NPS) offers up all the knowledge you need to know to plan a wickedly awesome adventure. Safety first! This guide provides essential information on Death Valley Invasive Burros. The invasive burros in the park today are the descendants of animals introduced into the environment by humans over the last 150 years. They can be mean and aggressive, especially when defending their young. Before our trip, it’s crucial that we all read this guide for what to do if we see an invasive burro. Another important aspect of our trip to read up on is safety and park rules. With these temperatures, it’s essential that you drink at least one gallon of water per day. If you start to feel dizzy, nauseous or have a headache, step away from the sun and drink plenty of water. You might even want to bring extra water and a towel to make a cold compress if necessary.

Did you know that GPS devices will steer you to take “shortcuts” over the desert and into canyons? When you’re out hiking Death Valley, don’t rely on technology to get you around! Remember, we will be in the middle of the desert, so assume cell service will be spotty. These are just a few safety tips. Check out the Visitor Guide for them all. Okay, now it’s on to the fun stuff! You might not have liked your early wake-up call, but there is a reason we got to the park so early. We’re going to Zabriskie Point, known for its golden badlands, to see the sunrise. Next, we’ll hit Badwater Basin, the lowest point in North America, and Artists Drive, which the guide describes as “a scenic loop drive through multi-hued hills.” If you’re feeling up for a long adventure, you might check out Ubehebe Crater. This breathtaking site was created hundreds of years ago after a volcanic explosion mixed with an underground spring to form a 600-foot crater.

So little time, so much to do! Read the do-not-miss list in the guide to get suggestions on other must-see spots at the park. The sun is finally going down, and we cannot wait to catch a view of the Death Valley night sky at The Harmony Borax Works, which has a mule cart, a neat backdrop for night photography. Did you know Death Valley has one of the darkest skies in the United States? Bring some snacks for stargazing – we plan on oohing and aahing for at least 30 minutes. According to the visitor’s guide, it takes about 30 minutes for your eyes to adjust to being able to see the most stars. And we want to see them all!

With Death Valley National Park Junior Ranger Adventure in tow, little ones who visit Death Valley can become an Official Junior Ranger. This booklet guides you through what to pack for your adventure to Death Valley. It also offers a map for kids to circle the places they have visited at the park. As they explore the park, kids can play Junior Ranger Bingo, marking spots for completing tasks like finding a plant on the dunes, spotting a cactus, and recording the temperature. Other activities in the booklet include creating a desert animal, exploring the night sky, and telling tall tales like Death Valley Scotty. This storyteller became famous for suggesting he had found gold in Death Valley. People frequented his castle to hear his stories about Death Valley and find out if they could strike it rich there. Scotty’s Castle is currently closed, but reopening to the public in 2020. When you’re all finished at the park, head to a visitor center or ranger station in Death Valley National Park. Show a ranger the book and tell them all about your adventure. Then your little ranger will be sworn in as an official Junior Ranger and get a badge. For being the hottest place on Earth, that’s pretty cool!

With views of dunes and rainbow canyons, Death Valley is one of the most spectacular sites we may have ever seen. We’re so glad you brought along plenty of water to stay hydrated enough to enjoy the activities. See you next time, travelers!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.

Images courtesy of NPS.

 


GPO Summer Travel Series: Yes to Yosemite

June 26, 2019

Yosemite National Park, courtesy of NPS

How is your summer going so far? GPO is here to help you make it an extra special one, and we’re pretty confident this next destination in our Summer Travel Series is going to do just that. Early conservationist champion John Muir described the forests of our upcoming stop as surpassing “all others of their kind in America, or indeed the world, not only in the size and beauty of trees, but in the number of species assembled together, and the grandeur of the mountains they are growing on.” This park has so much to offer, from valleys to falls to giant sequoias. Slide on some good water shoes and say “yes” to the sprays of the falling waters of Yosemite National Park!

For first-time Yosemite visitors, the park can be overwhelming. After all, it is made up of 748,436 acres, 800 miles of trails and about 30 different waterfalls. Luckily, there are resources to help you decide which sites you want to hit during your visit. Yosemite: A Guide to Yosemite National Park from the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service is a great resource to read before planning your trip. Part One of the guide introduces the park and John Muir, who helped propose the boundaries of the park in 1889 and wrote magazine articles that led to the park’s creation in 1890. Did you know Yosemite is one of America’s very first National Parks? Part Two explores the park’s natural and cultural history. Part Three presents a concise guide and reference materials, including a full-color map of the park.

We’re particularly excited to be taking you to Yosemite National Park in July when the flowers are in their peak at the Subalpine Meadows. In a brilliant mix of purples and golds, Alpine wildflowers at Tuolumne Meadows are truly enchanting in super bloom. Another site that’s a must-see? Grizzly Giant, one of the most massive Sequoias in Mariposa Grove. If you were feeling old today, we suggest you pay your respects to this noble tree, which is about 1,800 years old. Can’t get enough of the jaw-dropping scenery? Head over to North America’s tallest waterfall. Yosemite Falls is composed of three parts: The upper, middle, and lower parts. From here you will get breathtaking views of Yosemite Valley. Quick! Grab your binoculars from your daypack. We think we spotted a bear. Yosemite is home to as many as 500 black bears. And that’s just the start of Yosemite.

Wish you could wake up to Yosemite every morning? The Yosemite National Park Poster depicts the park’s wondrous rock forms, hanging valleys, waterfalls, lakes, and streams with El Capitan and Half Dome forming the central spectacle with Bridalveil and Yosemite Falls.

Were you blown away by this National Park? We hope your answer is “yes”! Thanks for coming along to Yosemite on our Summer Travel Series, and stay tuned for more to come in Summer 2019.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


Nature Photography Day

June 12, 2019

Do you need some inspiration for your Instagram account? You’re in luck. June 15 is designated Nature Photography Day. According to the North American Nature Photography Association (NANPA), the day is meant to promote the enjoyment of nature photography, and to explain how images are used to advance the cause of conservation and protect plants, wildlife, and landscapes.

If you’re not sure what to take a picture of, flip through A Photographer’s Path from the Department of the Interior and National Park Service to get started. The book includes a collection of images from photographer Thomas Paradis that highlight nature and history in the Greater Washington, D.C. area, with photos from parks in Washington, D.C., West Virginia, Maryland and Virginia. Photographs of streamside ferns and queen snakes at Catoctin Mountain Park, dew drops on Magnolias at National Capital Parks – East, white trout lilies at George Washington Memorial Parkway, and a lone butterfly flying over a crowd of bur-marigolds, will leave you in awe of the elegant beauty of nature – and get you thinking about what you might want to capture. Is it the squirrel that scurries around your backyard, that waterfall you’ve been wanting to hike, or millions of stars twinkling on a clear night? This publication, in particular, takes you through trails, aquatic gardens, grasslands, tunnels, forts, streams, and forests, and would make the perfect coffee table book. The photos are part of the National Park Service’s Inventory and Monitoring program, which aims to communicate the significance of park natural resources. Check out the book for a full list of the 15 parks featured, then choose one to visit yourself!

Swallowtail perched on branch Manassas National Park, from A Photographer’s Path.

So you got a stunning nature shot that you’re really feeling good about? Post it to your favorite social media! You can also frame it and give it as an inexpensive gift to friends or family. Or, if you’re feeling extra creative, make a nature box. In it, keep your best photos, along with collected items like leaves, dandelions, twigs, seashells, or unique rocks you find as you go. If you have kids in your life, they will love helping out with a project like this.

The best part about Nature Photography Day is that you get to be in nature! Whether it be with kids, a grandparent, a friend, a significant other, a pet, or just yourself, make a day of exploring and studying flora and fauna. We want to hear from you! Where will you be heading this Nature Photography Day to capture the perfect shot? We hope to see you on June 15 in the great outdoors.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


More Trees Please: Publications for Arbor Day

April 23, 2019

Do you remember planting a tree at school on Arbor Day when you were younger? We sure do! Here’s a little background on the holiday that recognizes some of our most underrated friends – trees!

In 1872, Nebraska newspaper editor and nature-lover J. Sterling Morton proposed a tree-planting holiday called “Arbor Day” at a meeting of the State Board of Agriculture. Morton believed that adding more trees would make the newly formed Nebraska Territory more attractive to settlers. On April 10, 1872, the first Arbor Day celebration took place, and more than one million trees were planted in Nebraska. In 1885, Arbor Day became a legal holiday in Nebraska, and it only felt right that the holiday would be observed on Morton’s birthday, April 22. During the 1870s, other states passed legislation to commemorate Arbor Day, and it became a tradition for school children to plant trees on the day. Today all 50 states celebrate Arbor Day. It is primarily observed on the last Friday in April, but the date varies from state to state depending on what time of year is best to plant trees. Morton went on to serve as the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture under President Grover Cleveland, and several U.S. presidents have proclaimed a national Arbor Day during their presidencies.

This Arbor Day, get to know the trees around you and how we can keep them healthy and protected. Read up on tree species, forest ecosystems, and the life cycle of trees with these books that will have you shouting “more trees please!”

Why Would Anyone Cut a Tree Down details the life cycle of trees and explains how trees work as a renewable source. This beautifully illustrated book will help teach kids from a young age to respect and appreciate trees and all they do for us.

The National Individual Tree Species Atlas covers each tree species in the United States and exactly where each species is likely to grow or not grow. This work complete with illustrations will benefit silviculturists, foresters, geneticists, researchers, botanists, wildlife habitat biologists, and landscape ecologists. In other words, this atlas is excellent for anyone involved in natural resources management or monitoring impacts of climate change … or someone who just loves visiting America’s forests and landscapes!

Does your home seem to have some trees that don’t look healthy? You’re not alone. How to Recognize Hazardous Defects in Trees from the Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Forest Service was created to help homeowners and land managers like you recognize hazardous defects in trees. The publication suggests possible corrective actions to restore trees to good health, so the trees on your property continue to live their best lives.

Imagine trying to quantify all the benefits of trees. Doesn’t sound easy, right? Southern forests provide a variety of critical ecosystem services, from the purification of water and air to recreational opportunities for millions of people. Trees at Work is a guide from the Department of Agriculture and U.S. Forest Service that proposes a sound approach to quantifying the services provided by these ecosystems.

On a fruitful note, Fruitful Legacy from the Department of the Interior and National Park Service provides information about the development of the most common types of orchards and fruit trees in the United States.

Whether it’s a pretty pink Japanese Cherry Blossom, a venerable Weeping Willow, or a Giant Sequoia, trees are without a doubt one of the most magnificent parts of our world. Each tree has its own unique purpose on Earth. What’s your favorite type of tree and why? Let us know in the comments below and have a wonderful Arbor Day!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


National GIS Day

November 13, 2018

Wednesday, November 14 is National Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Day. The annual event celebrating technology and all of the benefits it has brought to the world of geography has been recognized since 1999.

GIS is a system designed to capture, store, manipulate, analyze, manage, and present spatial or geographic data. However, GIS can refer to a number of different technologies, processes, and methods.

This year’s theme is Discover the World through GIS, with a focus on demonstrating the real-world GIS applications that are making a difference in our society. GISday.com has several story maps available that allow users to experience the changes our world has undergone through the use of mapping. One in particular, 100 Years of the National Park Service, takes you on a chronological journey of the significant events in the establishment and growth of America’s unparalleled system of public parks.

The US Government Publishing Office (GPO) has a long history of working with Federal depository libraries to provide Government information, including maps and GIS data. On govinfo, GPO offers a snapshot of the Federal Register Volume 75, Issue 173, where the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the availability of a final GIS tool and its user guide titled, “ICLUS v1.3 User’s Manual: ArcGIS Tools and Datasets for Modeling U.S. Housing Density Growth.”

GPO also offers access to several items that can help you celebrate this unique day, as the Government Bookstore offers several titles about this topic. Some of those include:

  • Washington: The Nation’s Capital  This handy pamphlet provides a color map of Washington, DC with all the major landmarks, memorials, monuments, and tourist attractions clearly marked, and folds up to fit easily in a pocket or purse.  It also features a timeline of important events with information about key historical sites on the other side, including the newest attractions, such as the new Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial.  Sold in packages of 100 copies only.
  • Rocky Mountain National Park (Map) Rocky Mountain National Park’s 415 square miles encompass and protect spectacular mountain environments. Enjoy Trail Ridge Road – which crests at over 12,000 feet including many overlooks to experience the subalpine and alpine worlds – along with over 300 miles of hiking trails, wildflowers, wildlife, starry nights, and fun times. The Rocky Mountain National Park map is a 1:50 000-scale topographic map.
  • National Park Service Centennial 1916-2016 (Map and Guide) – The National Park Service celebrated 100 years on August 5, 2016. This map shows locations of historic parks in celebration of the centennial for tourists to use as a guide.

GPO’s commitment to Keeping America Informed will continue to strive to provide access to Government information on all issues that affect the public in all aspects of their life.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Scott Pauley is a former Writer and Editor in GPO’s Library Services and Content Management office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: The Carolina Countryside

August 29, 2018

Well folks, we’ve traveled north, south, east and west. We’ve experienced the mountains, the cities, the coasts, the caves, the glades, the geysers, the forests and the canyons of our amazing nation. This summer has been one epic adventure after another. Now we’ve just got one more stop before the leaves start to change, the air turns crisp, and it’s back to the grind of setting the alarm, packing lunches and checking the kids’ homework. There’s only one place we can think of that has the ability to put our minds at ease before what is expected to be a bumpy ride back to reality. Pasturelands, ponds and peace, here we come. We’re about to get a taste of the simple life in the countryside of North Carolina.

Poet-author Carl Sandburg, who received two Pulitzer Prizes for his writing, once described poetry as “the achievement of the synthesis of hyacinths and biscuits.” According to his granddaughter Paula Steichen, this was descriptive of his own life at his home called Connemara where family horses fed on grain and hay left over from the goat herd. Sandburg enjoyed meandering around the farm, which was complete with a large vegetable garden, a berry patch, an orchard, chickens and hogs, and its nearby trails infused with wildflowers and mosses. The estate’s 247 acres (that’s about 187 football fields!) and view of the Blue Ridge Mountain Range in the distance provided Mr. Sandburg with quietude he needed for his writing. It’s no wonder his poems like the one titled “Prairie” were essentially anthems to the countryside. His love of the land became a common theme throughout his verses. But the countryside didn’t just inspire him to write. It also inspired song. According to his granddaughter, the family would gather after dinner to sing along while Sandburg played guitar and his daughter played the piano. She remembers, “The dining room was also a family room – a place to gather for conversation, song and fellowship.”

Ingrain yourself in the simple yet rich life of Carl Sandburg. The Carl Sandburg Home Official National Park Handbook, available at the GPO Bookstore, offers an introduction to the Carl Sandburg Home National Historic Site in Flat Rock, North Carolina. In Part 1, Paula Steichen, granddaughter of Carl Sandburg, tells of the family life at Connemara. In Part 2 she presents a biographical essay on Mr. Sandburg and his works, detailing some of his incredible accomplishments, including receiving the Medal of Freedom from President Johnson in 1964. Part 3 of the handbook provides tourist information and reference materials for exploring the grounds which offered, as Mr. Sandburg would put it, some of the “universal things that are free to everybody.”

We hope the sloping pastures have you breathing a little more deeply and the rolling fields have got you feeling at one with nature. Now, the tide is coming in. We hiked at high elevations in Arizona. We indulged in clambake of Cape Cod. We watched lily pads float in Florida. We were humbled by redwoods of California. We admired bison in Wyoming. We stood where soldiers fell in Virginia. We smelled hyacinths and biscuits of North Carolina. And that’s not even the half of it. But most importantly, we heard the stories of the history, culture, wildlife, and people that make our country so great. Thank you for coming along for the ride.

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: Historic Virginia

GPO Summer Travel Series: Visiting Massachusetts

GPO Summer Travel Series: Seeing Stars

GPO Summer Travel Series: Cave Dwellers, Fossil Finders and Dinosaurs Galore

GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Historic Virginia

August 10, 2018

Hey there our tenacious tourists! How are you holding up? If this humidity hasn’t worn you out yet, come along! There are still a couple more places we want to take you in our Summer Travel Series. Don’t worry, they’re going to be super cool. Oh sorry, we mean super awesome. The heat isn’t letting up yet. We’re headed to the home of American Civil War action. It’s where Federal artillery dueled Confederate cannons, brigades formed, men hunkered down behind embankments, dismounted Confederate cavalrymen held their ground against thousands of Federals, and soldiers rescued wounded comrades. Virginia, we’re ready to experience all your history has to offer!

Our first stop is Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, located in south central Virginia between Richmond and Lynchburg. Appomattox Court House from the GPO Bookstore tells the story of Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House, which led to the conclusion of the Civil War. It also details the battles fought in the days before it. The book contains essays by three eminent historians on events leading up to the Civil War and the implications of Appomattox for the post-Civil War generation. You’ll learn interesting details of the Civil War you never knew before! For example, Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan’s most effective unit was a small group of clandestine horsemen who dressed up in Confederate uniforms and infiltrated Confederate lines to gain valuable information. Another fun fact? On the ride back to his headquarters from the McLean house, Ulysses S. Grant actually forgot to notify the War Department of the day’s events in the rush to finalize details of Lee’s surrender. The handbook also offers a tourist’s guide to the park and invites you to “imagine the activity of those April days when Lee’s veterans laid down their flags, stacked their weapons, and began the journey back to their homes.” All the restored and reconstructed buildings in Appomattox Court House National Historical Park are within easy walking distance and there is no established order you have to follow. So just walk around and take it all in.

Next we’re making our way to The Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. Fredericksburg Battlefields from the GPO Bookstore describes the Civil War battles fought in Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Court House and the condition of those battlefields today. Here, within 17 miles, more than 100,000 American soldiers fell in the midst of chaotic, bloody battles involving strategy and tactics beyond their understanding. Want a little taste of the chaos that ensued? Stonewall Jackson was badly wounded by the mistaken fire of his own troops. And Maj. Gen. Edward “Allegheny” Johnson used his cane as a weapon during the Battle at the Bloody Angle where hand-to-hand fighting raged for 20 hours along a curving portion of the line that came to be known as the “Bloody Angle.”

Now that was a history lesson if we’ve ever had one. Virginia might be one of our favorite stops yet. What’s been your favorite adventure so far this summer? Have you dangled your feet off a dock? Napped in a hammock? Gone for a bike ride? If not, keep living up the summer! Its suns are setting, its boardwalks are clearing and its days are fleeting. Until next time!

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: Visiting Massachusetts

GPO Summer Travel Series: Seeing Stars

GPO Summer Travel Series: Cave Dwellers, Fossil Finders and Dinosaurs Galore

GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


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