Government Resources for Great Outdoors Month

June 9, 2020

June is designated as ’Great Outdoors Month.’ According to the Department of the Interior, you can celebrate this month by “getting out to America’s public lands and waters.” We here at GPO know how tough it’s been to stay at home this spring with the coronavirus pandemic, but one of the best things you can do for your mental health during this time is to get outside. And luckily, many of our national parks are beginning to partially or fully reopen.

The South Rim of the Grand Canyon in Arizona is now open for recreational access with some services. According to the National Park Service, day hiking is now permitted on rim and inner canyon trails, and some visitor facilities are open. Desert View and North Rim remain closed.

A Living Canyon: Discovering Life at the Grand Canyon from the GPO Bookstore describes the diverse wildlife of the Grand Canyon and how plants and animals are adapting as the global climate changes.

The rumors are true … high elevation is likely to affect you differently than your home environment. If you and other family members or friends aren’t used to hiking in high elevations, you’ll want to come extra prepared for hiking the Grand Canyon. Drink lots of water, take breaks if you need to, and protect your skin with sunscreen and hats.

Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado is open, but some facilities and areas remain closed due to COVID–19. According to the National Park Service, beginning June 4, Rocky Mountain National Park will require a timed entry permit or camping reservation to enter the park in a private vehicle between the hours of 6 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Rocky Mountain National Park (Map) from the GPO Bookstore covers the 415 square miles of spectacular mountain views. Use this map to find Trail Ridge Road, which crests at over 12,000 feet and offers many overlooks to experience the subalpine and alpine worlds, along with over 300 miles of hiking trails, wildflowers, wildlife, starry nights, and fun times.

If you live near Yellowstone National Park, you’re in luck. Yellowstone National Park opened its Montana entrances Monday, June 1 at 10 a.m. The Montana entrances include West Entrance (near West Yellowstone), North Entrance (near Gardiner), and Northeast Entrance (near Cooke City).

At Yellowstone, as Naturalist John Muir described it back in the 1880s, prepare to see “Nature at work as a chemist.” With more active geo-thermal features than the rest of the world, Yellowstone is wild and alive. Sure, you’ve heard of the famous Old Faithful. But altogether there are actually more than 10,000 thermal features at Yellowstone, including geysers, hot springs, mudpots, and fumaroles. Here, you’ll experience a rainbow of vivid colors as water flows from hot springs, starting with yellow, then orange and green. The unique activity in the park provides geologists with a glimpse into what goes on thousands of miles beneath the Earth’s surface. In all its bubbling and erupting wonder, Yellowstone has been regarded as a sacred place by the groups of people who have lived near it throughout time. In fact, it’s believed that early Native American visitors to Yellowstone left offerings at thermal features to show their respect.

Purchase the Yellowstone National Trip Planner 2020 to help you navigate the expansive park at over 30,000 square miles connecting land through the states of Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming. This handy 16-page pocket guide provides you and your family with all the essential details to help you plan for a memorable trip.

The GPO Bookstore has these and many other national park resources for you to explore. We hope everyone is staying safe and healthy during these unprecedented times. If you have the opportunity this June, visit a national park near you!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Holiday Gift Guide: Publications for the Avid Traveler

November 26, 2019

Joshua Tree National Park, NPS

The holidays are right around the corner! It’s time to stop distracting yourself with perfecting your hot chocolate recipe, hanging the stockings with care, and dashing through the snow, and begin the real work – shopping for gifts! GPO is here to help all season long with our 2019 holiday gift guide. Today, we’re discussing avid travelers. These happy nomads are perhaps some of the hardest people to shop for. Their free spirits are inspired by adventure, not material things! They bop from here to there with an insatiable wanderlust and a desire to discover new food, art, sceneries, and people.

The perfect place to start with a gift for a traveler? Think about where they’re headed to next and give them some resources to help them prepare! GPO offers Official National Park Handbooks for Yellowstone, Yosemite, the Everglades, Cape Cod, and so much more. From great geysers to canopies of trees to charming seashores, the traveler in your life will be in awe of these spectacular destinations. These handbooks, produced by the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service, offer endless information about the cultural and natural history of these National Parks, so the recipient of your well-thought out gift will be ready to tackle their next adventure. Along with any of these books, gift your favorite globetrotter with a special travel journal where they can write all about their journey and keep train tickets to memorable destinations or receipts for favorite foods they’ve tried around the globe.

The National Park System wall map poster shows the locations of parks in the National Park System. It was developed by the Publications Office at Harpers Ferry Center in response to the high volume of requests for an oversized version of the map of the National Park Service system. The map shows all 392 authorized units of the park system and measures 39 by 29 inches. Frame this poster as the perfect gift for anyone who loves the National Parks. Really want to go all out? Print and frame photos of your friend or family member on their travels so they can surround their poster with lots of personal pictures to remind them of their trips.

Treasured Landscapes showcases paintings, watercolors, sketches, and other works on paper from over 50 National Park Service museum collections. These works of art are seen together in this book for the first time to illustrate and tell the story of the Service’s first 100 years. Assembled to commemorate the National Park Service Centennial, 1916–2016, artworks capture the diversity of the national parks and Park Service collections, as well as the richness of artists’ encounters. They reflect the critical role that landscape art played in the establishment of the National Park Service. The works shown in the book capture awe-inspiring landscapes, honor individuals who have contributed to the nation’s identity, and commemorate inspiring American ideas and events.

Are you travelling somewhere exciting yourself? If so, be on the lookout for neat souvenirs for the avid traveler and add them to any of these publications for the perfect gift.

It can feel nearly impossible to find a good gift for someone who has seen so many parts of the world. When you start to get stressed, just think of the cozy crackle of the fire, or the jolly laughter of children making snow angels. Then, turn to GPO, of course! We hope this post helped give you a few ideas. Stay tuned for more gift ideas to come this holiday season. Happy gifting from GPO!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.

 


GPO Summer Travel Series: Glacier National Park

September 5, 2019

Going-to-the-Sun Road, NPS.

Summer is coming to a close. But there’s still one spot left on our bucket list. It might be last, but with its majestic alpines, spiritual falls, and shaggy-coated mountain goats, it is certainly not least. Bring your bug spray and pack away your snacks in case we spot a bear. Our last stop in our 2019 summer travels, nicknamed “Crown of the Continent” for its royal grandeur, is in Montana’s Rocky Mountains. We’re heading to one of our most scenic parks yet – Glacier National Park!

Okay, Junior Rangers, open your Junior Park Ranger Glacier National Park booklet! Your first challenge is to help park visitors leave no trace at the park. Let’s keep the park in pristine condition for the animals who live here and the people who visit after us. It’s essential to be wise about wildlife. Glacier is bear country, with both black bears and grizzly bears. Flip through your booklet to learn about how to hike with bears nearby and what every one of us can do to help wild animals survive in their natural habitats!

To get into the park, we’ll take a drive down Going-to-the-Sun Road, one of the main attractions of Glacier National Park. With views of peaked mountains, purple wildflowers, lush valleys, and Aspen groves, you’ll want to get your camera out for this part! Notice how clear the water is? The lakes here keep their enviable blue-green color because of the cold temperature of the water. Since most of the lakes don’t get above 50 degrees Fahrenheit at the surface, very few plankton grow here.

Time for a history lesson! The Salish, Kootenai, and Blackfeet peoples have been in and around the area of Glacier National Park for thousands of years. Once the settlers arrived, places were often renamed for the newcomers. Open your booklet to guess the native names for these places. Can you figure out the names of the digestive system of the buffalo, the waterfall where warrior woman and others went for spiritual guidance, and the mountain you need to be extra respectful of when visiting? Next, complete the rhymes to learn about how people moved through the area at different times throughout history, starting with the first Americans who traveled through the mountains in tribal bands. Once Glacier National Park was established in 1910, The Great Northern Railway company began to build hotels, trails, and of course, the railroad. This railroad provided transportation for those who wanted to travel West.

In 1932, Waterton-Glacier became the very first International Peace Park in the world. The park, which merged Canada’s Waterton Lakes National Park and America’s Glacier National Park, symbolized the longstanding friendship between Canada and the United States. Now, write about what peace means to you. Stop and listen — the sounds of the water crashing on the rocks or the croaky calls of a Clark’s Nutcracker here at Glacier might help you describe your definition of peace!

Did you know scientists have been studying the glaciers in this park for more than 100 years? Since then, Glacier National Park has lost many of its glaciers, and many are shrinking. In your booklet, connect the dots to see what Shepard Glacier looked like 100 years ago and what it looks like now. Let’s go on a Geology Hunt in the park. At Lake McDonald, there are rocks of all colors of the rainbow! The Kootenai Indians called Lake McDonald “Dancing Place” because they believed it to be an excellent place to sway, spin, and twirl. What geological evidence can you find here? Look out for different colored pebbles, rocks in the streams, and the peaks on top of the mountains. These mountains, along with the U-shaped valleys, were shaped by the glaciers long ago.

Not quite at reading age yet? No problem! The GPO Bookstore has still got you covered with the Pre-Reader Activity Guide for Glacier National Park’s Youngest Junior Rangers. This booklet is full of fun activities for Glacier’s littlest explorers.

Thank you for experiencing the splendor that is Glacier National Park with us. We hope you learned a lot and that Glacier rejuvenated you for the school year ahead. Stay wild, travelers!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Coronado National Memorial

August 26, 2019

Our upcoming destination is one that started as a quest for cities lined with goldsmith shops, grand homes, and doorways studded with emeralds and turquoise. And even though these places turned out to be real only in tall tales, today we will discover the rich history and culture that evolved due to the expedition to find them. Kids, grab your Coronado National Memorial Junior Ranger Guide from the GPO Bookstore. We’re off to Cochise County, Arizona to discover Coronado National Memorial!

In February of 1540, Francisco Vázquez de Coronado, who had served as a prominent member of the Mexico City council, left Compostela in Mexico. Along with him were 339 soldiers, a few Franciscan priests, and more than 1,100 Indian allies and slaves. Their mission? Discover the Cities of Cibola, which were believed to be bubbling over with gold, and claim them for Spain. Members of the expedition traveled along the San Pedro River, through deserts, and over mountains. With them, they brought more than 1,500 animals, such as horses, sheep, pigs, and cattle. They walked for two years, never to find the fabled cities. However, the arrival of Coronado and his armed expedition led to profound cultural change, which can still be observed today. Coronado, the soldiers, and the priests taught Spanish to the indigenous people of the region. Coronado’s expedition might not have led to the discovery of cities dripping in diamonds. But, it led to the later Spanish colonization of Southwest America, creating the Hispanic-American culture that lives on today.

First things first. Let’s explore the Memorial on a nature walk. Follow the path and count your steps to get a sense of just how far the expedition members walked when they made the two-year trek close to 4,000 miles. Keep an eye out for wildlife! Coronado National Memorial has 55 different kinds of mammals, including baby bats and black bears. As for plants, we might spot Yucca, Manzanita, Ocotillo, Agave, and more. Open your booklet to see what they look like and mark them as we go.

Coronado Cave, NPS.

Next, we’re climbing 500 feet uphill to Coronado Cave! Historians believe that the Coronado Expedition might have sent exploring parties into the Huachuca Mountains where there are caves. Junior Rangers, open your booklets. Be ready to identify and sketch stalactites (these hang from the ceiling), stalagmites (these rise from the cave floor), and columns (where stalactites and stalagmites meet together).

Everyone pack in the van. We’re driving to the trailhead of Montezuma Pass. In your booklet, add a checkmark next to animal tracks you see. We’re looking for the traces of Turkey Vultures, White-Tailed Deer, Spiny Lizards, Coatis, and even Mountain Lions!

Once we hit the visitor center, we’ll get the opportunity to touch and feel some clothing items similar to those worn by members of the Coronado Expedition. In your booklet, write down how things feel when you pick them up. Were they light or heavy? What would these items protect you from on an expedition? At the Touch Table in the visitor center, touch the skulls and tracks of animals that are common in Coronado National Memorial.

Now, it’s time to mail a postcard to someone back home. Open your booklet for one that’s already available and ready to send! Tell the recipient of the postcard what your favorite part of visiting the National Memorial was.

The final and perhaps most crucial activity in this booklet is to complete the National Park Service Arrowhead, which represents the values that are protected by the National Park Service. In it, draw pictures of things you saw at Coronado National Memorial that you think should be protected.

We hope you enjoyed everything at Coronado National Memorial and all the fun activities in the National Park Service booklet. Stay tuned for more Summer Travels, and search “summer travel” on this blog to visit several other amazing national parks.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Pecos National Historical Park

August 6, 2019

Mission Church and Convento

Thus far this summer we’ve experienced the aloha spirit of Hawaii, the falling waters of Yosemite, and even the golden badlands of Death Valley. You may be thinking there can’t possibly be any more to see. But our Nation is vast, with 58 national parks eagerly awaiting your adventure upon arrival. And our next park is full of rich culture and history. With a little imagination, you can still see this park’s original inhabitants weaving baskets from yucca plants and gathering around to tell the stories of their ancestors. Get ready to experience a big sky and open spaces at Pecos National Historical Park!

Before we head off for New Mexico, pick up the Pecos Junior Ranger Activity Book from the GPO Bookstore. This booklet lets kids explore the sites and history of Pecos National Historical Park, learn about the people, stories, and places of Pecos, and protect the park. They’ll start by interviewing a Park Ranger about their job. Before you know it, the kids in your crew will be living as the Pecos people once did – designing pottery, decoding messages in Morse Code, and creating a unique brand of cattle.

The booklet also serves as a guide for what to see and do at the park. The Ancestral Sites Trail will take us up through the Pecos Pueblo, which used to be a Native American community, and lead us to the Mission Church and Convento. Here, we will explore one of the reconstructed kivas, which were pit-houses used for religious ceremonies. You may notice that the structures are circular and have a hole in the middle. These holes represent the Pecos people’s connection to the underworld.

Using an ancient agricultural technique that originated in Mexico, the people of Pecos grew corn, beans, and squash and caught fish in the Pecos River. However, the Pecos people needed to trade with their neighboring tribes to prosper. In the booklet, readers will help the people from the Rio Grande Valley, and the Great Plains move their goods to the Pecos Pueblo to participate in the trade fair!

Did you know soldiers in the Civil War fought a Battle at Pecos? There’s still more to see! Next let’s hike the Battlefield Trail and explore the place where the Battle of Glorieta Pass, also known as the Gettysburg of the West, was fought. Though this pass is well-known for being a place of Civil War battle, humans have actually traveled on it for over 10,000 years!

Next, it’s off to Forked Lightning Ranch and Kozlowski’s Trading Post where travelers who made their way across the Santa Fe Trail stopped to purchase goods. Today the Trading Post is part of the Forked Lightning Ranch, the land along part of the Pecos River. According to the National Park Service, this land “has nourished and served the needs of the inhabitants and settlers of the region” for hundreds of years.

That’s all for Pecos. As always, thanks for coming along! We’re so glad we got to experience this park with you. What’s been your favorite park so far? Relive some of your old memories by searching “summer travel” on this blog. Rest up, and we will see you again soon for more travels!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Bandelier National Monument

July 10, 2019

River-carved valley landscape, Bandelier National Monument. NPS.

Welcome back, summer travelers. If historic caves, petroglyphs, and ceremonial grounds inspire you, get excited. Thousands of years ago, in what is now modern-day New Mexico, Ancestral Pueblo people built homes carved from volcanic tuff. Today, the National Park Service protects the structures and cultural architecture at this next destination. So, what are you waiting for? Mentally prepare to climb lots of ladders, and let’s pay tribute to the place that preserves ancient Ancestral Pueblo dwellings—Bandelier National Monument!

With activities for kids from first grade to seventh grade, Bandelier National Monument Junior/Deputy Ranger Booklet is just what you need to make sure your trip to this National Monument is an educational adventure. First things, first! Together, let’s learn to respect and protect the park with a fill-in-the-blank challenge. Little Junior Rangers will be challenged to cross off things they see at the park – like cliff dwellings, the village, and ladders. To spot some of the ladders, we’ll head to the Alcove House. A series of four ladders and stone stairs make up the 140-foot climb to get to the house. Archeologists believe this house was once home to about 25 people. Another trail with ladders will lead to the Ancestral Pueblo village of Tsankawi. Here you’ll find distinct paths that the Ancestral Pueblo people themselves used – and experience the views of the mesa as they did thousands of years ago. Did you know human presence in the area goes back over 11,000 years?

Next, Junior Rangers will be challenged to interview a Ranger at the park. And once they climb the ladder into a Cavate Home, readers will be challenged to decide the best spot in the home to build a fire, store food, and sleep. Now, we’re going to take a stab at being an archeologist! Junior Rangers will look at structures, such as Big Kava and Tyuonyi ruins, from Ancestral Pueblo times, and think about what questions they would need to ask about each of the structures to determine their uses. Remember, the Ancestral Pueblo people lived here from about 1150 CE to 1550 CE, so they didn’t have the convenience of modern technology like we do today.

Another neat thing to check out at Bandelier? The Long House! These cliff dwellings were three to four stories tall. Here, you’ll see hundreds of petroglyphs, or carved drawings. Painted Cave, which can be accessed from the Bandelier Visitor Center or the Dome Trailhead, is a great place to observe even more of these illustrations.

In a valuable lesson about protecting species, the National Park Service booklet discusses animals that used to live amongst the Ancestral Pueblo people but can no longer be found in the park today. The booklet asks children which species they believe could be reintroduced to the park, as well as what they can do to help keep other species from disappearing from their original habitat.

We’re impressed with how much you were able to see at the park! Now that we have finished exploring for today, let’s head back to the visitor center and give the booklet to a Ranger to complete your challenge.

Awesome work. We hope you enjoyed getting a taste of life as an Ancestral Pueblo person as well as learning about the importance of protecting and respecting places we visit, especially ones with rich culture and relics that we want to keep safe. Summer is just getting started, and so are we. We can’t wait to take you to our next destination. Keep following along!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS RESOURCE?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: A Visit to Death Valley

July 5, 2019

Summer is heating up, and it’s about to get even hotter. Located near the border of California and Nevada in the Great Basin, this next stop in our summer travel series is the hottest place on Earth. On July 10, 1913, the temperature in this National Park was 134°F. Fill up your jugs of water, strap on your hiking boots, and pack your water misting fans. Summer travelers, we hope you’re ready for Death Valley National Park in Inyo County, California!

Death Valley National Park Visitor Guide from the National Park Service (NPS) offers up all the knowledge you need to know to plan a wickedly awesome adventure. Safety first! This guide provides essential information on Death Valley Invasive Burros. The invasive burros in the park today are the descendants of animals introduced into the environment by humans over the last 150 years. They can be mean and aggressive, especially when defending their young. Before our trip, it’s crucial that we all read this guide for what to do if we see an invasive burro. Another important aspect of our trip to read up on is safety and park rules. With these temperatures, it’s essential that you drink at least one gallon of water per day. If you start to feel dizzy, nauseous or have a headache, step away from the sun and drink plenty of water. You might even want to bring extra water and a towel to make a cold compress if necessary.

Did you know that GPS devices will steer you to take “shortcuts” over the desert and into canyons? When you’re out hiking Death Valley, don’t rely on technology to get you around! Remember, we will be in the middle of the desert, so assume cell service will be spotty. These are just a few safety tips. Check out the Visitor Guide for them all. Okay, now it’s on to the fun stuff! You might not have liked your early wake-up call, but there is a reason we got to the park so early. We’re going to Zabriskie Point, known for its golden badlands, to see the sunrise. Next, we’ll hit Badwater Basin, the lowest point in North America, and Artists Drive, which the guide describes as “a scenic loop drive through multi-hued hills.” If you’re feeling up for a long adventure, you might check out Ubehebe Crater. This breathtaking site was created hundreds of years ago after a volcanic explosion mixed with an underground spring to form a 600-foot crater.

So little time, so much to do! Read the do-not-miss list in the guide to get suggestions on other must-see spots at the park. The sun is finally going down, and we cannot wait to catch a view of the Death Valley night sky at The Harmony Borax Works, which has a mule cart, a neat backdrop for night photography. Did you know Death Valley has one of the darkest skies in the United States? Bring some snacks for stargazing – we plan on oohing and aahing for at least 30 minutes. According to the visitor’s guide, it takes about 30 minutes for your eyes to adjust to being able to see the most stars. And we want to see them all!

With Death Valley National Park Junior Ranger Adventure in tow, little ones who visit Death Valley can become an Official Junior Ranger. This booklet guides you through what to pack for your adventure to Death Valley. It also offers a map for kids to circle the places they have visited at the park. As they explore the park, kids can play Junior Ranger Bingo, marking spots for completing tasks like finding a plant on the dunes, spotting a cactus, and recording the temperature. Other activities in the booklet include creating a desert animal, exploring the night sky, and telling tall tales like Death Valley Scotty. This storyteller became famous for suggesting he had found gold in Death Valley. People frequented his castle to hear his stories about Death Valley and find out if they could strike it rich there. Scotty’s Castle is currently closed, but reopening to the public in 2020. When you’re all finished at the park, head to a visitor center or ranger station in Death Valley National Park. Show a ranger the book and tell them all about your adventure. Then your little ranger will be sworn in as an official Junior Ranger and get a badge. For being the hottest place on Earth, that’s pretty cool!

With views of dunes and rainbow canyons, Death Valley is one of the most spectacular sites we may have ever seen. We’re so glad you brought along plenty of water to stay hydrated enough to enjoy the activities. See you next time, travelers!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.

Images courtesy of NPS.

 


GPO Summer Travel Series: Yes to Yosemite

June 26, 2019

Yosemite National Park, courtesy of NPS

How is your summer going so far? GPO is here to help you make it an extra special one, and we’re pretty confident this next destination in our Summer Travel Series is going to do just that. Early conservationist champion John Muir described the forests of our upcoming stop as surpassing “all others of their kind in America, or indeed the world, not only in the size and beauty of trees, but in the number of species assembled together, and the grandeur of the mountains they are growing on.” This park has so much to offer, from valleys to falls to giant sequoias. Slide on some good water shoes and say “yes” to the sprays of the falling waters of Yosemite National Park!

For first-time Yosemite visitors, the park can be overwhelming. After all, it is made up of 748,436 acres, 800 miles of trails and about 30 different waterfalls. Luckily, there are resources to help you decide which sites you want to hit during your visit. Yosemite: A Guide to Yosemite National Park from the Department of the Interior and the National Park Service is a great resource to read before planning your trip. Part One of the guide introduces the park and John Muir, who helped propose the boundaries of the park in 1889 and wrote magazine articles that led to the park’s creation in 1890. Did you know Yosemite is one of America’s very first National Parks? Part Two explores the park’s natural and cultural history. Part Three presents a concise guide and reference materials, including a full-color map of the park.

We’re particularly excited to be taking you to Yosemite National Park in July when the flowers are in their peak at the Subalpine Meadows. In a brilliant mix of purples and golds, Alpine wildflowers at Tuolumne Meadows are truly enchanting in super bloom. Another site that’s a must-see? Grizzly Giant, one of the most massive Sequoias in Mariposa Grove. If you were feeling old today, we suggest you pay your respects to this noble tree, which is about 1,800 years old. Can’t get enough of the jaw-dropping scenery? Head over to North America’s tallest waterfall. Yosemite Falls is composed of three parts: The upper, middle, and lower parts. From here you will get breathtaking views of Yosemite Valley. Quick! Grab your binoculars from your daypack. We think we spotted a bear. Yosemite is home to as many as 500 black bears. And that’s just the start of Yosemite.

Wish you could wake up to Yosemite every morning? The Yosemite National Park Poster depicts the park’s wondrous rock forms, hanging valleys, waterfalls, lakes, and streams with El Capitan and Half Dome forming the central spectacle with Bridalveil and Yosemite Falls.

Were you blown away by this National Park? We hope your answer is “yes”! Thanks for coming along to Yosemite on our Summer Travel Series, and stay tuned for more to come in Summer 2019.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Aloha from Hawai’i

May 20, 2019

Aloha and welcome back to the GPO Summer Travel Series! Because we made it through the cold, harsh winter, there’s no better place to start our summer travels than this next destination. If you’re in the mood for some aloha spirit, ancient tales, and bamboo forests, then get ready. We’re headed to Hawai’i!

Our first stop is Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Home to two of the most active volcanoes in the world, Kīlauea and Mauna Loa, this National Park also boasts many rare plants and animals as well as several places important to native Hawaiian culture. With Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park Junior Ranger Handbook in hand, children will be challenged to complete a two-part scavenger hunt. During the hunt, junior rangers will learn the names of Hawaiian wildlife, including the red “puff ball” flower on an ‘Ohi’a Lehua tree, the two native Hawaiian butterflies, the Hawaiian name for the Hawaiian Hawksbill Sea Turtle, and so much more. Next, they will learn to find and protect three homes – unusual trees that can’t be found anywhere else in the world – in the park. When they read the story of Pele, the Hawaiian goddess of volcanoes, kids will be amazed by the magical powers of her molten body that makes land tremble and lights the sky on fire! Their last activity is certainly not least. The booklet guides kids through exploring the Thurston Lava Tube (Nahuku). Nahuku, which formed about 600 years ago, was once an underground river of lava. What was left behind is a long cave with ecosystems that we are only beginning to understand.

Next, we’re headed north to Maui to explore Haleakala National Park! Bring along the Haleakala National Park brochure from the National Park Service and U.S. Department of the Interior to learn about the Summit Area Trails, which are great for trips as quick as an hour or as long as four days. Plus, this little brochure is packed with information about Hawaiian history and culture. For example, Hawaiians believe in the concept of kuleana, which means responsibility. According to the pamphlet, the Hawaiians believe it is one’s duty to perpetuate this kuleana and to pass it on to the future. Plus, learn which areas are closed to public access because of their sacred nature. Kanaka Maoli, or Native Hawaiians, believe that these areas are inhabited only by Nā Akua (deities). Have you ever thought about the interrelationships between people and their resources? The Native Hawaiians have. In fact, they have an ancient, sacred oral chant, called the Kumulipo, which describes these relationships. Most importantly, this guide, which is created by Native Hawaiians, will offer visitors like ourselves guidance on how to respect the natural and cultural resources of the park.

Want to be extra knowledgeable before your trip to Hawai’i? Characteristics of Hawaiian Volcanoes from the Natural Resources Conservation Service establishes a benchmark for the current understanding of volcanism in Hawai’i. The articles in this publication build upon the revolutionary work of Dutton, Jagger, Steams, and other USGS and academic scientists. The chapters outline lessons learned from various aspects of volcanism in Hawai’i. The findings in this resource are mainly based on continuous observation of eruptive activity and on research into volcanic and earthquake processes during the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory’s (HVO’s) first 100 years.

Well, folks, leaving Hawai’i is undoubtedly not going to be easy. If we can’t stay here with the koa trees, Koleas, and lehua blossoms, what’s the next best thing to do? Bring Hawai’i home! Hawai’i Volcanoes is a poster by renowned late graphics artist, Charley Harper. In it, he depicts Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park using bright oranges, blues, pinks, and yellows. The original painting, commissioned by the U.S. National Park Service in 1986, is perfect for kids who love the wild.

We’ve started our summer travels strong. Thanks for coming along to the beautiful island of Hawai’i. We’re just getting started! Stay tuned for more exciting places all summer long.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


Spring into Outdoor Fun with These Books

March 19, 2019

A growing body of research from the scientific community demonstrates the many benefits of spending time in nature, including meaningful improvements on mental and physical health. But when the weather becomes dauntingly cold, it’s easy to get in a rut of staying indoors. Sometimes all you need is a little inspiration to be remembered what peace, gratitude and pure joy can be experienced by spending some time outside. Check out these publications for the motivation you need to get your family into the great outdoors this spring!

Connecting People to Their Public Lands 2017 provides an overview of accomplishments by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in the areas of education, volunteers, and youth involvement. The report outlines BLM’s programs that provide opportunities for Americans to connect with their public lands and waters to pursue healthy, active lifestyles. Read about the initiatives, including a series of BLM’s Junior Ranger Program, Every Kid in a Park, Hands on the Land, and others, and all their wonderful benefits, in this report. Included in the report are inspirational accounts of visitors, volunteers, and students who have cleaned up trash in rivers, tasted wild raspberries, smelled Labrador leaves, and hiked over rocks and falls. You’ll be fascinated to learn about the great work this agency is doing, from educating underrepresented youth on environmental education to creating plans for more recreational trails to hosting wildland firefighting training courses for military veterans.

Published by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the 2016 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation provides a detailed snapshot of our nation’s passion for wildlife and nature. According to Gregory Sheehan of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the report “serves as a road map” to guide the agency’s efforts to “reach more Americans and provide them with opportunities to hunt, fish, and otherwise enjoy America’s wildlife and wild places.” The results are astonishing. In 2016, more than 103 million Americans (that’s 40% of the U.S. population 16 years and older) participated in some sort of fishing, hunting, or other wildlife-associated recreation such as birdwatching or outdoor photography.

With all their youthful energy, little ones need to get outside and run around. One of the newest Junior Ranger Activity Booklets, Wilderness Explorer, provides the opportunity for them to do just that. The booklet starts the rangers off by having them pack essentials they want to bring on their adventure. It then takes them through Wilderness Areas in the United States. It teaches them how to Leave No Trace on their public lands by picking up litter, recycling and reusing. The booklet instructs Little Junior Rangers to think like a scientist and create a hypothesis around something they observe in nature.

Death Valley National Park Ranger Adventure (produced by the U.S. National Park Service {NPS}) offers several activities and educational information for children on a trip to Death Valley National Park in California. With this booklet, children will explore some of the darkest skies in the United States at Death Valley, learn about Death Valley’s changing landscape, and even learn the story of Death Valley Scotty who became famous for telling tall tales about finding gold and building a castle in the desert. Teachers and school librarians may also enjoy these fun-filled lessons to share with their classroom students as part of a learning adventure.

Members of the Coronado Expedition walked nearly 4,000 miles throughout the two-year journey. Now it’s your family’s turn to follow in Coronado’s footsteps with the Coronado National Memorial Junior Ranger Guide. Take a trip to Coronado National Memorial in Sierra Vista, Arizona and bring this handy adventure guide along. Here, you might see 55 different kinds of mammals from baby bats to big black bears. Even explore Coronado Cave and be on the lookout for stalactites, stalagmites, and columns. This booklet encourages kids to do something we all should do more often: sit and be. It instructs kids to take a bit of time to rest, listen, smell and watch. That’s one the adults might want to get in on as well!

Finally, a visit to Bandelier National Monument in New Mexico with Bandelier National Monument Junior/Deputy Ranger Booklet in tow is bound to be a trip you won’t forget. Junior Rangers will find a Ponderosa Pine, interview a Park Ranger, and identify alien plants, making for a trip they’ll tell all their friends about when they return home.

The season of frolicking under wandering clouds, tending to blossoming buds, and when lucky, stumbling across beautiful birds’ nests is finally here. Spring is easily one of the best seasons to spend time outside. So whether you plan a structured trip to explore wildlife and various landscapes, or just explore the beauty in your own backyard, we hope you enjoy your time in nature this season.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


Discover U.S. National Park Service Posters

March 8, 2019

In the 1990s, National Park Service (NPS) commissioned Charley Harper, an American Modernist artist, to design 10 posters of wildlife. They wanted the art to capture the diversity of public lands in America; “from the lava flows of Hawaiian Volcanoes . . . to the icebergs of Glacier Bay, Alaska, . . . from the heights of the Rocky Mountains . . . to the depths of the Coral Reef.” Harper, an experienced traveler, drew inspiration from nature and used his unique style of minimal realism.

The poster with Hawaii’s volcanoes shows a typical volcanic eruption that destroys everything in its path but Harper also gives the audience multiple perspectives. Upon closer inspection, the art illustrates how life is created through a destructive force. The archipelago of Hawaii was formed by volcanic eruptions millions of years ago. The image of Hawaii that we know of today is a lush, tropical island with volcanoes. The greenery is direct result of volcanic soil which is rich in nutrients. “[The soil] are light and fluffy, low density and have remarkable water-holding capacity.” Another view is that lava is flowing into the ocean thus creating more land. The island of Hawaii, also known as Big Island, is continually growing and providing more habitats for life. Harper’s artistic style maybe minimalistic but is by no means simple.

Can you find multiple perspectives in the Rocky Mountains poster?

Several of the commissioned posters are available for purchase at the GPO Bookstore. The Catalog of Government Publications (CGP) is another GPO resource that can be used to discover Government posters. For example, the University of Iowa digitized Harper’s Glacier Bay poster, and it’s available through the CGP. The CGP can also be used to learn more about the extensive research Federal agencies have conducted about natural wonders in the U.S.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Vanathy Senthilkumar is a Systems Librarian at GPO.


GPO Summer Travel Series: Historic Virginia

August 10, 2018

Hey there our tenacious tourists! How are you holding up? If this humidity hasn’t worn you out yet, come along! There are still a couple more places we want to take you in our Summer Travel Series. Don’t worry, they’re going to be super cool. Oh sorry, we mean super awesome. The heat isn’t letting up yet. We’re headed to the home of American Civil War action. It’s where Federal artillery dueled Confederate cannons, brigades formed, men hunkered down behind embankments, dismounted Confederate cavalrymen held their ground against thousands of Federals, and soldiers rescued wounded comrades. Virginia, we’re ready to experience all your history has to offer!

Our first stop is Appomattox Court House National Historical Park, located in south central Virginia between Richmond and Lynchburg. Appomattox Court House from the GPO Bookstore tells the story of Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House, which led to the conclusion of the Civil War. It also details the battles fought in the days before it. The book contains essays by three eminent historians on events leading up to the Civil War and the implications of Appomattox for the post-Civil War generation. You’ll learn interesting details of the Civil War you never knew before! For example, Maj. Gen. Philip Sheridan’s most effective unit was a small group of clandestine horsemen who dressed up in Confederate uniforms and infiltrated Confederate lines to gain valuable information. Another fun fact? On the ride back to his headquarters from the McLean house, Ulysses S. Grant actually forgot to notify the War Department of the day’s events in the rush to finalize details of Lee’s surrender. The handbook also offers a tourist’s guide to the park and invites you to “imagine the activity of those April days when Lee’s veterans laid down their flags, stacked their weapons, and began the journey back to their homes.” All the restored and reconstructed buildings in Appomattox Court House National Historical Park are within easy walking distance and there is no established order you have to follow. So just walk around and take it all in.

Next we’re making our way to The Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park. Fredericksburg Battlefields from the GPO Bookstore describes the Civil War battles fought in Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania Court House and the condition of those battlefields today. Here, within 17 miles, more than 100,000 American soldiers fell in the midst of chaotic, bloody battles involving strategy and tactics beyond their understanding. Want a little taste of the chaos that ensued? Stonewall Jackson was badly wounded by the mistaken fire of his own troops. And Maj. Gen. Edward “Allegheny” Johnson used his cane as a weapon during the Battle at the Bloody Angle where hand-to-hand fighting raged for 20 hours along a curving portion of the line that came to be known as the “Bloody Angle.”

Now that was a history lesson if we’ve ever had one. Virginia might be one of our favorite stops yet. What’s been your favorite adventure so far this summer? Have you dangled your feet off a dock? Napped in a hammock? Gone for a bike ride? If not, keep living up the summer! Its suns are setting, its boardwalks are clearing and its days are fleeting. Until next time!

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: Visiting Massachusetts

GPO Summer Travel Series: Seeing Stars

GPO Summer Travel Series: Cave Dwellers, Fossil Finders and Dinosaurs Galore

GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


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