50 Years of history that never grows old

July 19, 2019

Who in America hasn’t heard those words ending man’s life’s limitation only to Earth – “The eagle has landed?” The words of Astronaut Neil Armstrong signaled the safe landing of the Apollo 11 lunar module on the moon. Fifty years and numerous moon landings later, the day of the moon landing is still worthy of national celebration. America can be proud of the bravery of men and women who’ve risked their lives to conquer space; for technological advances conceived and produced to support this human adventure like no other. A moment that captured the spirit of a nation neither bound by the limits of the unknown nor the uncertainty of reaching for the stars.

To take part in this national day of courage and achievement, now you can purchase one or more of the published portraits of the adventures and challenges met by one of America’s most valuable resources, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); a name that may not capture the true essence of its magnificence, but a well-documented story of mankind at some of its most memorable moments.

The U.S. Government Bookstore offers the following NASA publications related to the remarkable history of the Apollo 11 mission.

Exploring the Unknown: Selected Documents in the History of the United States Civil Space Program: V. VII: Human Spaceflight: Projects Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo. This publication includes a selection of expert essays and official documents about the evolution of U.S. human spaceflight programs: Projects Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo. It emphasizes important documents relating to aerodynamics and man-in-space research as well as recommended activities the lunar vehicle should do and what symbolic items should be brought for the First Lunar Landing (such as the iconic American flag planted on the moon).

NASA’s First 50 Years: Historical Perspectives; NASA 50 Anniversary Proceedings. A wide array of scholars turn a critical eye toward NASA’s first 50 years, probing an institution widely seen as the premier agency for space exploration in the world. Fifty years after its founding, this NASA publication offers historical perspectives to help illuminate what came next.

View of an astronaut’s foot and footprint in the lunar soil. Image courtesy of NASA.

On July 29, 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the NASA Act. Over the next 50 years, NASA achieved spectacular feats, from advancing the well-established field of aeronautics to pioneering new fields of Earth and space science and human spaceflight. In the midst of the geopolitical context of the Cold War, 12 Americans walked on the Moon, arriving in peace “for all mankind.” Humans saw their home planet from a new perspective, with unforgettable Apollo images of Earthrise and the “Blue Marble,” as well as the “pale blue dot” from the edge of the solar system. Since, spacecraft have studied Earth, probed the depths of the solar system and the universe beyond. In the 1980s, the evolution of aeronautics gave us the first winged human spacecraft, the Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station that stood as a symbol of human cooperation in space as well as a possible way station to the stars. Though important to note, given the Apollo fire and two Space Shuttle accidents, NASA has also seen the depths of tragedy.

When Biospheres Collide: A History of NASA’s Planetary Protection Programs. This book from the NASA History Series tackles the interesting duo of biological problems that should be familiar to anybody who has seen photos of Apollo astronauts quarantined after their return to Earth. Namely, how do we avoid contaminating celestial bodies with Earthly germs when we send spacecraft to study these bodies, and how do we avoid spreading foreign biological matter from space when our robotic and human spacefarers return to Earth? Biological matter from an external system could potentially cause an unchecked epidemic either on Earth or in space so strict precautions are necessary. Problems identified. Problems overcome.

Project Apollo: The Tough Decisions. This monograph presents the history of the manned space program from September 1, 1960 to January 5, 1968, the most critically important period during which NASA validated its ability to successfully venture beyond earth’s gravitational limits. Outlines detail the steps taken from the early Mercury days through the operation tests conducted with Gemini, to the qualification of Apollo. It describes the key technical, operational, and management milestones and how key issues in each phase of the space program were resolved. Anyone thinking about becoming a space adventurer? Read first-hand how NASA has made such ventures soon within our reach.

Many other space related adventures and fascinating articles about new products created by America’s space journey are available here.

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Custoer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Ed Kessler is a Promotions Specialist in GPO’s Publication and Information Sales program office.


We’re Over the Moon for These Space Day Pubs

May 2, 2019

Life Cycle of Stars – NASA image.

This year International Space Day will be celebrated around the world on May 3. Space Day, founded in 1997 and expanded to International Space Day in 2001, is dedicated to sharing the excitement of space exploration. According to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the holiday “is a time to learn more about our universe and to excite others about space, too.” And what better way to learn about our universe than through official Federal publications?!

Since President Eisenhower signed the National Aeronautics and Space Act on July 29, 1958, to create NASA, the agency has worked to achieve a wide array of spectacular accomplishments for mankind, including sending a man to the moon, successfully landing a man-made object on Mars, and creating the first spacecraft to orbit Saturn, just to name a few. The agency has allowed humans to see their planet from a perspective they never had before. NASA’s First 50 Years covers these accomplishments. But it also remembers tragedies such as the Apollo fire and the Columbia and Challenger accidents.

Did you know that the International Space Station is a large, multi-functioning spacecraft that orbits the earth? Since November 2, 2000, astronauts have lived in this spacecraft, which is about the size of a house with five bedrooms and boasts a gymnasium and a big bay window. Learn more about the space object, which serves as one of the world’s most inspirational examples of international teamwork, in NASA’s Reference Guide to the International Space Station. This book discusses the creation of the International Space Station (ISS) and the vision for the station, which includes being a hub for scientific research, technological development, exploration, commerce, and education.

The Hubble Space Telescope is one of the most well-known names in space. And for a good reason! This spacecraft looks at the sky from beyond Earth’s atmosphere. It has the capability of seeing and snapping shots of stars, planets, nebulae, and galaxies with complete detail. The telescope provided conclusive evidence that hubs of most galaxies do indeed have substantial black holes with millions or even billions of stars. The Hubble is fast. No we mean, really really fast. In fact, it circles the entire Earth every 96 minutes. Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble has traveled about 2.83 billion miles. Hubble: An Overview of the Space Telescope provides an overview of the historic space telescope with sections on its history, design, operations, and cultural impact. Explore images of the telescope’s fascinating findings – like its image of the heart of the Lagoon Nebula 4,000 light-years away from Earth, its shot of four of Saturn’s moons passing in front of the planet, and its views of the galaxy M84.

What’s possibly more fascinating than the space missions of NASA? The stories of the brilliant minds behind them. William H. Pickering: America’s Deep Space Pioneer provides a biography of Dr. William H. Pickering, who pioneered the exploration of space at NASA. Shortly after NASA was established, Dr. Pickering was put in charge of NASA’s Ranger program, which aimed to capture live, close-up video images of the surface of the Moon. After getting off to a rough start, the mission proved successful, and America had its first close-ups of the Moon. Pickering’s team succeeded in conducting further lunar missions that paved the way for the Apollo mission that famously landed Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin on the Moon. Learn more about Pickering’s contribution to space exploration in this book.

Want to experience Space Day with your little ones? Order Junior Ranger Night Explorer, an activity booklet from the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior. The booklet will guide you through smart stargazing, including what items to bring with you so you can see all the planets and star clusters up close and personal. With Junior Ranger Night Explorer, your little rising stars will learn how to find the North Star, track phases of the Moon, learn about galaxies, and use all their senses to explore the night environment at a national park.

Even the U.S. Army uses knowledge of space for its missions. Space Warriors: The Army Space Support Team from the Department of Defense, Department of the Army, and Center of Military History, outlines the organizational and conceptual evolution of the Army Space Support Team (ARSST). These support teams provide warfighters the ability to leverage space capabilities. This helps soldiers enhance their intelligence and operation planning capabilities.

The facts and photos in these publications truly make us feel over the Moon, no pun intended. There is so much to know and learn about our beautiful, vast universe. We wish you all a happy Space Day!

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Sign up to receive promotional bulletin emails from the US Government Online Bookstore.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy a vast majority of eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Visit our Retail Store: To buy or order a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up(s).

Order by Phone or Email: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 4:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.  Email orders to ContactCenter@gpo.gov

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

Find more than a million official Federal Government publications from all three branches at www.govinfo.gov.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


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