GPO Summer Travel Series: Beach Health and Safety

July 17, 2018

If you’ve been following our summer travel series thus far, you know we’ve been busy sightseeing, hiking, and exploring National Parks all across the country. Phew, we are exhausted. You’ve earned a break! It’s island time. That is, time to bury our toes in the sand, embrace the ocean breeze, kick back and relax before heading off to our next destination. Make sure you’ve got your flip flops, plenty of sunscreen, a good book and your boogie board. It’s back to the beach for us, our trusty travelers! But first, let’s make sure we’re equipped for a safe and healthy trip.

While the boogie board isn’t a requirement for good times by the Oceanside, that sunscreen sure is! Did you know there’s actually a right way to apply sunblock? And even with sunscreen on, those tricky UV rays can still get through to your skin! According to the American Cancer Society, skin cancer is by far the most common type of cancer, and the number of skin cancer cases has been on the rise. In fact, one in five Americans will develop skin cancer by the age of 70, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation. Protect the little beach bums in your life and teach them healthy habits while they’re still young! It’s true. Applying sunscreen can be a messy drag. But GPO and the American Cancer Society are here to tell you this: it really doesn’t have to be all that miserable. Prepared with the support of the American Cancer Society, Mission: Sunwise Activity Book from the GPO Bookstore provides puzzles and pages to color about how to be safe in the sun and how to use sunscreen. It will be so worth it when you avoid that terrible sunburn … owiee … and can keep building as many sandcastles, hunting as many ghost crabs, collecting as many seashells and bobbing over as many waves as you want!

And while it’s important to keep ourselves safe and healthy at the beach, it’s also equally as important to make sure the ocean itself stays safe. According to thankyouocean.org, marine debris is defined as “any man-made, solid material that enters waterways directly through littering or indirectly through rivers, streams and storm drains.” Included in debris are plastic food wrappers, plastic bottle caps, grocery bags, plastic straws, plastic bottles, soda cans, balloons, glass bottles, cigarette butts, and fishing nets. All of these items, and many more, can potentially harm marine life. How? Animals often become entangled in the debris, causing them to have trouble eating, breathing and swimming. Many birds and fish also may mistake the debris for food. For example, plastic bags floating in the water strongly resemble jellyfish. This poses a major problem for the sea turtle, who often mistakes plastic bags for one of his favorite meals! What’s just as gross? This debris can even transfer up the food chain to humans, as we often enjoy fish and other seafood from the ocean. Help children learn about this very serious issue and become passionate about saving our marine life. Understanding Marine Debris is an activity booklet from the Department of Commerce and the National Marine Fisheries Service. A booklet for all ages, it contains an assortment of puzzles, brain-teasers and coloring activities to help children understand the problem of marine debris while having fun at the same time.

With its salty air, crashing waves, ocean spray and wild sunsets, the beach has the potential to create the absolute best memories. But it’s important to protect ourselves and our beaches and oceans while we can. Make your beach vacation a positive experience for the entire family with these publications from the GPO Bookstore. Rest up for now … under the protection of an umbrella, of course. There’s more summertime to come and more adventures to be had.

More from our Summer Travel Series:

GPO Summer Travel Series: California, Here GPO Comes

GPO Summer Travel Series: Exploring the Everglades

GPO Summer Travel Series: A Cape Cod Vacation

GPO Summer Travel Series: Your Trip to Yellowstone

GPO Summer Travel Series: Discover the Grand Canyon

GPO Summer Travel Series: What to Do and See in Washington DC

Don’t forget to check out our latest catalog America The Beautiful.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Cat Goergen is the PR Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations office.


Think you know pink? Increase your awareness of breast cancer

October 22, 2013

October-Breast-Cancer-Awareness-MonthOctober, the annual observance of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, is a time for reflection on the pervasiveness of the disease.

In the general US population, one in eight women will have breast cancer at some point in their lives and it is the most common cancer in American women.

1-in-8-get-Breast-Cancer

But breast cancer is not only confined to women. In 2009, 211,731 women and 2,001 men in the United States were diagnosed with breast cancer and 40,676 women and 400 men died from it.

Even if you believe in and support the cause, you can still be unaware how widespread breast cancer is, and what you can do– beyond wearing pink– to inform yourself and others to reduce your risks and those of your loved ones.

Breast-Cancer-Knowing-Is-Not-Enough

Federal Government Breast Cancer Research and Awareness

The Federal government is doing a great deal to increase public awareness and disease eradication: everything from lighting the façade of the White House with pink floodlights during the month’s observance to spending $602.7 million on research at the National Cancer Institute in 2012 and funding a number of stellar breast cancer publications from the Department of Health & Human Services for both consumers and health care professionals. Learning more can help you do your part to be more aware and give yourself and your family and friends a better chance at being healthy.

white-house-breast-cancer-monthImage above: The North Portico exterior of the White House is illuminated pink, Oct. 3, 2011, in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Source: Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson

Breast Cancer Risk Factors

The Healthy Woman: A Complete Guide for All Ages (ePub eBook)Many circumstances affect one’s chances for getting breast cancer. Some factors can be controlled; others cannot. In The Healthy Woman: A Complete Guide for All Ages (ePub eBook), we learn that the controllable risk factors include environment (exposure to second-hand smoke, chemicals, radon, etc.) and personal history (diet, UV exposure, use of alcohol, tobacco, drugs or some medications such as hormones, etc.), while family history (genetics) and the age at which a woman enters menopause are factors beyond a woman’s control.

Effects of Ethnic and Cultural Differences

Breast Cancer: Black Women Have Higher Death Rates From Breast Cancer Than Other Women  from Vital Signs 2011Statistical evidence shows that not all women, especially women of color, do enough, or can get enough care, to protect themselves from breast cancer. Reading Breast Cancer: Black Women Have Higher Death Rates From Breast Cancer Than Other Women can make a reader upset and more determined to do his or her best to prevent breast cancer. Breast cancer is the most common cause of death from cancer among Hispanic women, and the second most common cause of death from cancer among women from all other races.

According to this recent statistical report, black women are 40% more likely to die from breast cancer than white women, compared to women of other races/  ethnicities. New changes enacted since the report was issued late last year, such as implementation of open season starting under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) [Learn more about the ACA in our Government Book Talk post “Everything You Should Know About The Health Care Law], may improve the statistic, since the ACA will provide 30 million previously uninsured Americans with health care if they go get it. These changes might reduce the risk to women’s death rates from breast cancer in the future as health care becomes more available to all.

Preventing Breast Cancer

breast_cancer_infographicFor a woman to give herself the best possible chance of avoiding breast cancer, self-care is critical. According to the CDC’s infographic Protect Yourself from Breast Cancer, women can take steps to help reduce their risk for breast cancer by remembering to:

  • get at least four hours of exercise per week,
  • keep a healthy weight,
  • limit alcoholic drinks to one per day,
  • breastfeed their infants,
  • bear their children before age 35,
  • get regular mammograms,
  • perform monthly self-exams,
  • and/or make careful decisions about taking hormone replacement therapy (HRT).

In addition to having access to health care, women can improve their chances of avoiding and/or surviving breast cancer by improving their self-care, as mentioned. For more tips on getting this care, and getting the insurance and treatment to help with the care, women and their families can consult a wide variety of Federal government publications, including

Breast Cancer Screening Options

 The Guide to Clinical Preventive Services 2012: Recommendations of the U.S. Prev The Guide to Clinical Preventive Services 2012: Recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task ForceThe Guide to Clinical Preventive Services 2012 provides the latest recommendations for who should get a mammogram based on various risk factors including ethnic background and family history of breast cancer, when and how to do it and at what age. It also goes into the pros and cons of various alternative forms of breast cancer screening from the most reliable film mammography to digital mammography, MRIs, Clinical breast examination and breast self-examination.

Understanding Breast Changes: a Health Guide for WomenUnderstanding Breast Changes covers a discussion of the normal breast changes over the course of a woman’s lifetime, how to get a mammogram and understand the results, how to get the support you need, a glossary and a list of resources for more research. The Healthy Woman offers more general information on getting the right kind of health care for women. The writers recognize symptoms relating to particular diseases impacting a woman’s health, and they discuss various available treatment options for those diseases.

Breast Cancer Treatment Options

Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast CancerWhen women do find that they need treatment, particularly surgery, for breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), they need to know as much about their proposed procedure as possible. An informed patient can much better participate in her own recovery, and give needed information to her surgeon, as well as provide herself with the knowledge of what is normal and what symptoms require follow-up. Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast Cancer covers those topics, and is a good starting point for a woman facing surgery for either of those conditions, when she is also consulting her care provider, surgeon, friends and family.

These highlights from these informative books may have made you realize that it’s time for you to improve your own self-care, or urge the women in your life to improve theirs. If that is so, then the best place to start is with the some public health research. You can find out more by reading the publications listed below.

FOR THE PUBLIC:

How can I obtain these breast cancer publications?

1)    The Healthy Woman: a Complete Guide for All Ages [eBook] and The Guide to Clinical Preventive Services 2012: Recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

  • Shop Online: You can purchase these two publications from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov by clicking on the links above in this blog post or shopping our collection under our Cancer category.
  • Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.
  • Visit our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

2)     Protect Yourself from Breast Cancer [infographic], Breast Cancer: Black Women Have Higher Death Rates From Breast Cancer Than Other Women, Understanding Breast Changes: a Health Guide for Women, and Surgery Choices for Women with DCIS or Breast Cancer.

FOR LIBRARIANS: There are records available for the electronic versions of all these works in the Catalog of Government Publications, and you can buy your own copy of  The Healthy Woman: a Complete Guide for All Ages [eBook and The Guide to Clinical Preventive Services 2012: Recommendations of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force in the GPO Online Bookstore.

About the author(s): Adapted by Government Book Talk Editor-in-Chief and GPO Promotions & Ecommerce Manager, Michele Bartram, from an original blog post by Jennifer K. Davis from GPO’s Library Services & Content Management Division that supports the Federal Depository Libraries Program (FDLP).


Government Gets Healthy

June 4, 2010

 

Government Book Talk presents its first guest blogger!

My name is Kelly Seifert. I’ve been with GPO for nine years, working on initiatives for the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP). You may know me from the recent “GPO Takes to the Streets” promotional videos: http://www.fdlp.gov/outreach/promotionalresources/381-taketostreet. Most of my work centers on promoting the FDLP. I’m fascinated by the wide range of unique and intriguing Government documents out there and I’m always in search of interesting titles.

As I’ve heard more and more about the First Lady’s “Let’s Move” campaign to fight childhood obesity, I started to wonder what kinds of information resources were available from the Government on health and nutrition. It turns out there are plenty!

Thinking about childhood obesity, one document particularly stuck out. In 1995, the National Cancer Institute put out an educational game called, “Slam Your Way to Good Health by Eating Five Fruits and Vegetables a Day!” The game came with pop-out disks depicting healthy, tasty foods. Players took turns “slamming” or throwing down the disks and collecting the ones that landed face-up. What a neat way to teach kids about nutrition!

While currently out of print, you can easily access this game by visiting your local Federal depository library. Locate a library in your area here.

Looking at the Slam game made me curious to see what else was available from the Government on healthy living. What I found was pretty cool. There are resources available for all ages. Here are a few… 1) Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health, 2) Pocket Guide to Staying Healthy at 50+, 3) The Healthy Woman: A Complete Guide for All Ages, 4) Be Active Your Way: A Guide for Adults, and 5) MyPyramid: Steps To A Healthier You (Poster)…and the list goes on and on!

Learn more about “Let’s Move” at http://letsmove.gov/.


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