Marine Corps Birthday–10 November

On November 10, 1775, the Continental Marines were established by a resolution of the Second Continental Congress. In commemoration of this important day, Major General John A. LeJeune issued Marine Corps Order No. 47, Series 1921. This order is read aloud each year by every Marine Corps Command to honor the founding of the Marine Corps. Other celebrations include an annual birthday ball which is held at installations around the world.

In honor of the Marine Corps 242nd birthday, GPO offers a look at publications dealing with the United States Marine Corps and its rich history.

Those interested in uniforms should consult, The eagle, globe, and anchor, 1868-1968, which traces the history of the Marine Corps emblem and uniforms.

Diversity is important to the Marine Corps, two books:  Pride, progress, and prospects: the Marine Corps’ efforts to increase the presence of African-American officers (1970-1995) and Path Breakers U.S. Marine African American officers in their own words look at efforts to increase the number of African-American officers.

Free a Marine to fight: women Marines in World War II, History of the Women Marines, 1946-1977, and Women Marines in the 1980s look at women in the Marine Corps.

Herringbone cloak-GI dagger: Marines of the OSS uncovers the hidden role the Marines played in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency.

Marines engage in international and humanitarian relief efforts. Humanitarian operations in northern Iraq, 1991 with Marines in Operation Provide Comfort looks at one such operation.

Camp Pendleton: the historic Rancho Santa Margarita y Las Flores and the U.S. Marine Corps in Southern California, a shared history, a new history of an iconic installation, maps the history of the Marine Corps in California.

For additional books on the Marine Corps, the U.S .Government Bookstore has:

Among Heroes: A Marine Corps Rifle Company on Peleliu discusses the 1944 World War II,  Pacific Battle of Peleliu.

The United States Marine Corps in the World War. In 1919, then-Major Edwin N. McClellan was charged with researching and writing the official history of Marines in the First World War. First published in 1920, the 2015 reprint includes additional information on key leaders, as well as, images not included in earlier editions.

U.S. Marines and Irregular Warfare, Training and Education, 2000-2010 is a brief history recounting how the U.S. Marine Corps adapted to fight the Global War on Terrorism during 2000–2010.

Pathbreakers: U.S. Marine African American Officers in Their Own Words discuss how African American military officers navigated their way through successful careers in the United States Marine Corps.

The GPO Online Bookstore – Easy Access to Federal Publications

HOW DO I OBTAIN THESE RESOURCES?

Click on the Links: For the free resources, click on the links above in the blog post.

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at https://bookstore.gpo.gov.

Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Cynthia Earman is a Cataloging & Metadata Librarian in the Library Services & Content Management division of the U.S. Government Publishing Office.

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