The FBI Book You’ve Been Waiting For

July 22, 2016

The FBI Story is a 1959 American drama starring Jimmy Stewart. It’s an excellent film, but not the topic of this blog post. The FBI Story is also the title of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s annual summary of crime fighting operations and investigations.

THE FBI STORY 2015_027-001-00102-1-The FBI was founded on July 26, 1908. Over the course of its long history, a lot has happened under the Bureau’s law enforcement and intelligence purview—plenty to fill pages with. The latest progress report, The FBI Story 2015, is now available through GPO.

Securing America against threats of transnational cyber-crime syndicates, human trafficking operations, violent street gangs, international corruption, and terrorism is the work of the FBI. As director James Comey writes in his introduction, each year “the threats we face are moving faster and becoming harder to anticipate and stop.” Capable bureau employees work hard at adapting to ever evolving dangers. Many of their successes and as Comey notes, “some of the Bureau’s unique capabilities,” are featured in this latest edition.

FBI seal2015 was year full of scheming. The indictment of FIFA (the governing body of international soccer) officials on charges of racketeering, wire fraud, and money laundering was arguably the most high-profile case. FBI agents also played a role in dismantling multimillion-dollar schemes of the Ponzi and foreign corruption variety.

2015 was also a time to commemorate anniversaries. The Bureau marked 20 years since of the Oklahoma City bombing when special agents worked “one of the largest and most complex cases the FBI has ever undertaken.”

oklahoma city bombing 20Several task forces get status updates in this edition. The FBI has teams of experts in explosives, cyber action, and even art recovery. Some of their stories read like mystery novels. “The Case of the Stolen Stradivarius,” a brief tale of a rare instrument’s theft and recovery, is one example. So is “The Case of the Corrupt Coin Dealer.”

Fraud takedown. Cold case investigation. Quest for victim justice. Locating perpetrators of smash and grab robberies. Conversation surrounding law enforcement and race. Nationwide appeal to help find missing children. The FBI Story 2015 is all that. It’s a rundown of the important work of FBI agents do on behalf of the American people. And it’s also a reminder that the FBI works best with the full trust and cooperation of the American people.

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS PUBLICATION?

Shop Online Anytime: You can buy eBooks or print publications —with FREE Standard Shipping worldwide— from the U.S. Government Online Bookstore at http://bookstore.gpo.gov.

 Shop our Retail Store: Buy a copy of any print editions from this collection at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday–Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., except Federal holidays, Call (202) 512-0132 for information or to arrange in-store pick-up.

Order by Phone: Call our Customer Contact Center Monday through Friday, 8 am to 5:30 pm Eastern (except US Federal holidays). From US and Canada, call toll-free 1.866.512.1800. DC or International customers call +1.202.512.1800.

Visit a Federal depository library: Search for U.S. Government publications in a nearby Federal depository library. You can find the records for most titles in GPO’s Catalog of U.S. Government Publications.

About the author: Blogger contributor Chelsea Milko is a Public Relations Specialist in GPO’s Public Relations Office.


School safety by the numbers

March 9, 2012

Guest blogger GPO Public Relations Specialist Emma Wojtowicz discusses a publication about safety in schools.

School safety is a concern. The recent school shooting at the public high school in Chardon, Ohio, reminds us that any school is susceptible to violence and tragedy. Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2010, a publication by the Department of Education and Department of Justice, thoroughly examines the various indicators that threaten the safety of our nation’s schools.

The information and data in this report was collected through surveys conducted from 2007-2009. While this report is regularly published to help policymakers and schools develop ways to keeps schools safe and prevent crime and violence, it makes for an interesting read given recent events.

The report identifies 21 indicators that threaten the safety of schools. The indicators encompass a variety of problems like victimization, bullying, injury, fights, use of drugs and alcohol and weapons possession. Charts and graphs illustrate the data collected about each of the problems with breakdowns by age, ethnicity, gender, public versus private school, and urban versus rural school location.

Is your child afraid at school? For example, this chart shows the number of students from 12-18 who feel threatened at school or away from school. Here, Black students feel the most afraid at school, with Hispanics second, but Hispanic students feel more threatened outside of school than any other group. (CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE.)

There are also comparisons for some indicators between being at school and outside of school.

Who’s carrying? For example, the above graph from the book shows the percentage of high school students who carried a weapon on and off school property at least once in the last 30 days. The highest weapon-carrying groups were American Indians, Pacific Islanders and White students, with Asian and Black students as the lowest groups. (CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE.)

The content is organized well with a brief explanation about each indicators followed by the data depicted through charts and graphs making for easy navigation if there is a specific topic you are interested in.

Some interesting findings during the 2007-2008 school year:

  • Victims of bullying are about same for males and females: 30% of male students and 33% of female students reported being bullied
  • 5% of students reported being afraid of attack or harm at school
  • 1% of public schools have daily metal detector checks and 5% of public school have random metal detector checks
  • 6% of students reported carrying a weapon to school and 17% of students reported carrying a weapon anywhere in a 30-day period
  • 21 school-associated homicides occurred
  • 43% of public schools reported they have an electronic notification system for a school-wide emergency in place

It is difficult to analyze these statistics and determine whether or not schools are safe. From scanning the various line graphs, it is easy to notice there has been a decline over the years from the mid-1990s to 2009 regarding most of the indicators. Hopefully, this data is used to improve and strengthen the safety of schools. As our country was reminded on February 27 in Chardon, Ohio, any school is at risk and we must be steadfast in the effort to reduce the risks that leads to tragedy.

What measures are in place to keep your child safe at school? This chart from the book shows what school security measures have been put in place overall since 1999, the year of the Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. While all measures increased since 1999, many have dropped from a former high rate in 2003-5, such as use of security guards, metal detectors, locker checks or visible student ID badges. The only measures that have consistently grown over the years are: use of security cameras, instituting a code of student conduct, locked entrance and exit doors during the day, and a requirement that visitors to the school sign in. (CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE.)

HOW DO I OBTAIN THIS “Indicators of School Crime and Safety: 2010” BOOK?

  • Buy it online 24/7 at GPO’s Online Bookstore.
  • Buy it at GPO’s retail bookstore at 710 North Capitol Street NW, Washington, DC 20401, open Monday-Friday, 9am to 4pm, except Federal holidays, (202) 512-0132.
  • Find it in a library.

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